Humanitarian needs among displaced and female-headed households in government-controlled areas of Syria

Shannon Doocy, Emily Lyles

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. To identify unmet needs and assistance priorities of displaced and female-headed households in government-controlled areas of Syria. Methods. In mid-2016, we undertook a survey of accessible areas, largely urban and government-controlled, to identify unmet needs and assistance priorities. We used a cluster design with probability sampling to attain a final sample of 2405 households from 10 of 14 governorates; 31 of 65 (47.7%) districts were included that are home to 38.1% of people in need. Results. Displaced and female-headed households were more vulnerable than nondisplaced and male-headed households in numerous sectors. Despite approximately half of surveyed households reporting receipt of humanitarian assistance in the preceding month and apparently effective targeting of assistance by vulnerability, unmet needs were nearly ubiquitous. Conclusions.The humanitarian situation in inaccessible areas of Syria is likely to be considerably worse; thus, findings presented here likely underestimate humanitarian needs. Efforts to expand support to Syria's most vulnerable households are desperately needed as are innovative targeting and modalities that enable more efficient and effective assistance. (AmJ Public Health. 2017;107:950-959.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)950-959
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume107
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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