Human supplementary motor area is active in preparation for both voluntary muscle relaxation and contraction: Subdural recording of Bereitschaftspotential

Shogo Yazawa, Akio Ikeda, Takeharu Kunieda, Tatsuya Mima, Takashi Nagamine, Shinji Ohara, Kiyohito Terada, Waro Taki, Jun Kimura, Hiroshi Shibasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bereitschaftspotentials (BPs) preceding muscle relaxation and contraction were compared by using subdural electrodes which were implanted onto the right medial frontal surface in two patients with supplementary motor area (SMA) seizure. The applied movement paradigm (muscle relaxation and contraction tasks) was completely the same as employed in our previous study [Terada, K., Ikeda, A., Nagamine, T. and Shibasaki, H., Electroenceph. clin. Neurophysiol., 95 (1995) 335-345]. In both patients, either negative or positive BPs were observed in the SMA-proper and supplementary negative motor area (SNMA) starting at 1.2-1.8 prior to both movements. In one patient, BP was more widespread in the relaxation task whereas more restricted to the hand area in the contraction task. In the other patient, the BPs were observed in the cortical area rostral to SNMA (pre-SMA), in addition to the SMA-proper, in both tasks. It is concluded that SMA-proper and SNMA, and probably pre-SMA as well, in humans are similarly active in preparation for both voluntary muscle contraction and relaxation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-148
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume244
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 20 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bereitschaftspotential
  • Central motor control
  • Negative motor phenomenon
  • Pre-supplementary motor area
  • Supplementary motor area
  • Voluntary muscle relaxation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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