Human pressure perception values for constant and moving one- and two-point discrimination

Evan S. Dellon, Robin Mourey, A. Lee Dellon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

134 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the need to evaluate sensibility for accurate diagnosis and the need to record the degree of sensation achieved in the postoperative period, the clinician has been w ithout the ability to m easure hum an pressure perception accurately. T raditionally, the Semmes-Weinstein m onofilam ents were used to m easure the static onepoint discrim ination threshold. A new sensory testing instrum ent, the Pressure-Specifying Sensory Device, was used to obtain norm ative data from the index and little finger o f the dom inant hand in 35 people ranging in age from 16 to 83 with no known neurologic im pairm ent. Pressure perceptions for static one- and two-point discrim ination (s 1PD, s2PD) and moving one- and two-point discrimination (m lP D, m2PD) were recorded. T h e mean values (±SD) were 0.13 ± 0.06, 0.24 ± 0 .1 2, 0.22 ± 0.10, and 0.26 ± 0.13 gm /m m 2 for slP D, s2PD, m lP D, and m2PD, respectively, on the index finger and 0.07 ± 0.05, 0.16 ± 0.12, 0.17 ± 0.07, and 0.21 ± 0.14 gm /m m 2 for slP D, s2PD, m lP D, and m2PD, respectively, for the little finger. T h e little finger was significantly m ore sensitive than the index finger (p < 0.001). There was no significant change in pressure perception with increasing age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-117
Number of pages6
JournalPlastic and reconstructive surgery
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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