Human immunodeficiency virus testing among people who inject drugs in rural west Virginia

Sean T. Allen, Suzanne M. Grieb, Rebecca Hamilton White, Allison O'Rourke, Michael E. Kilkenny, Christopher M. Jones, Carl Latkin, Susan G. Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Limited research exists on factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing among people who inject drugs (PWID) in rural America. The purpose of this research is to identify factors associated with rural PWID in Appalachia having not been tested for HIV in the past year. Methods. Cross-sectional data (n = 408) from a 2018 PWID population estimation study in West Virginia were used to examine factors associated with PWID having not been tested for HIV in the past year. Results. Most participants identified as male (61%), white, non-Hispanic (84%), and reported having recently injected heroin (81%) and/or crystal methamphetamine (71%). Most (64%) reported having been tested for HIV in the past year, 17% reported having been tested but not in the past year, and 19% reported never having been tested. In multivariable analysis, not having been in a drug treatment program in the past year was associated with PWID not having been tested for HIV in the past year (adjusted prevalence ratio, 1.430; 95% confidence interval, 1.080-1.894). Conclusions. Drug treatment programs may be important venues for rural PWID to access HIV testing; however, testing services should be offered at multiple venues as most PWID had not engaged in drug treatment in the past year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S346-S353
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume222
Issue numberSupplement_5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV
  • HIV testing
  • People who use drugs
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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