Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) type 1 antibodies in perinatal HIV-1 infection

Association with human HIV-1 transmission, infection, and disease progression

for the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Anti -human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 antibodies in 242 pregnant women and 238 infants were measured at birth and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months after birth, to estimate their association with perinatal transmission and infant disease progression. Maternal anti-p24 (P = .01) and anti-gp120 (P = .04) antibodies were inversely associated with vertical transmission rates, independent of maternal percentage of CD4 cells, hard drug use, duration of ruptured membranes, serum albumin levels, serum vitamin A levels, and quantitative HIV-1 peripheral mononuclear blood cell culture, but not with maternal plasma immune complex dissociated p24 or HIV-1 RNA copy number, both of which were highly correlated with antibodies. From ages 1-2 months, anti-gp120, -gp41, -p31, and -p66 decayed to a greater extent in infected than in uninfected infants. Infected infants produced anti-p24 antibody by age 2 months, anti-p17 by 4 months, and anti-p41 and anti-gp120 by 6 months. As early as birth, infants with rapid disease progression had lower levels of anti-p24 than did infants whose disease did not rapidly progress, but not independently of HIV-1 RNA levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1243-1246
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume182
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Infectious Disease Transmission
Virus Diseases
Disease Progression
HIV-1
Antibodies
Mothers
Parturition
RNA
Antigen-Antibody Complex
Vitamin A
Serum Albumin
Pregnant Women
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Blood Cells
Cell Culture Techniques
Membranes
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) type 1 antibodies in perinatal HIV-1 infection : Association with human HIV-1 transmission, infection, and disease progression. / for the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS).

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 182, No. 4, 2000, p. 1243-1246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Anti -human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 antibodies in 242 pregnant women and 238 infants were measured at birth and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months after birth, to estimate their association with perinatal transmission and infant disease progression. Maternal anti-p24 (P = .01) and anti-gp120 (P = .04) antibodies were inversely associated with vertical transmission rates, independent of maternal percentage of CD4 cells, hard drug use, duration of ruptured membranes, serum albumin levels, serum vitamin A levels, and quantitative HIV-1 peripheral mononuclear blood cell culture, but not with maternal plasma immune complex dissociated p24 or HIV-1 RNA copy number, both of which were highly correlated with antibodies. From ages 1-2 months, anti-gp120, -gp41, -p31, and -p66 decayed to a greater extent in infected than in uninfected infants. Infected infants produced anti-p24 antibody by age 2 months, anti-p17 by 4 months, and anti-p41 and anti-gp120 by 6 months. As early as birth, infants with rapid disease progression had lower levels of anti-p24 than did infants whose disease did not rapidly progress, but not independently of HIV-1 RNA levels.",
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