Human Exposure to the Jet Fuel, JP-8

Raymond H. Tu, Clifford S. Mitchell, Gary G. Kay, Terence H Risby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: This study investigates anecdotal reports that have suggested adverse health effects associated with acute or chronic exposure to jet fuel. Methods: JP-8 exposure during the course of the study day was estimated using breath analysis. Health effects associated with exposure were measured using a neurocognitive testing battery and liver and kidney function tests. Results: Breath analysis provided an estimate of an individual's recent JP-8 exposure that had occurred via inhalation and dermal routes. All individuals studied on base exhaled aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons that are found in JP-8. The subject who showed evidence of the most exposure to JP-8 had a breath concentration of 11.5 mg · m-3 for total JP-8. This breath concentration suggested that exposure to JP-8 at an Air Guard Base is much less than exposure observed at other Air Force Bases. This reduction in exposure to JP-8 is attributed to the safety practices and standard operating procedures carried out by base personnel. The base personnel who exhibited the highest exposures to JP-8 were fuel cell workers, fuel specialists and smokers, who smoked downwind from the flightline. Discussion: Although study-day exposures appear to be much less than current guidelines, chronic exposure at these low levels appeared to affect neurocognitive functioning. JP-8-exposed individuals performed significantly poorer than a sample of non-exposed age- and education-matched individuals on 20 of 47 measures of information processing and other cognitive functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-59
Number of pages11
JournalAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Volume75
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Jet fuel
Kidney Function Tests
Air
Health
Personnel
Computer operating procedures
Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Liver Function Tests
Automatic Data Processing
Liver
Cognition
Inhalation
Fuel cells
Education
Hydrocarbons
Guidelines
Safety
Skin
Testing
JP8 aviation fuel

Keywords

  • Breath analysis
  • Exposure assessment
  • Neurocognitive effects
  • Renal and liver function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Tu, R. H., Mitchell, C. S., Kay, G. G., & Risby, T. H. (2004). Human Exposure to the Jet Fuel, JP-8. Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 75(1), 49-59.

Human Exposure to the Jet Fuel, JP-8. / Tu, Raymond H.; Mitchell, Clifford S.; Kay, Gary G.; Risby, Terence H.

In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 75, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 49-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tu, RH, Mitchell, CS, Kay, GG & Risby, TH 2004, 'Human Exposure to the Jet Fuel, JP-8', Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 49-59.
Tu, Raymond H. ; Mitchell, Clifford S. ; Kay, Gary G. ; Risby, Terence H. / Human Exposure to the Jet Fuel, JP-8. In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 75, No. 1. pp. 49-59.
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