Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology

Nicholas Zachos, Olga N Kovbasnjuk, Jennifer Foulke-Abel, Julie In, Sarah E. Blutt, Hugo R. de Jonge, Mary K. Estes, Mark Donowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3759-3766
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of biological chemistry
Volume291
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 19 2016

Fingerprint

Organoids
Physiology
Stem cells
Stem Cells
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Pluripotent Stem Cells
Adult Stem Cells
Regenerative Medicine
Cell Division
Intestines
Diarrhea
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Pathogens
Cell culture

Keywords

  • differentiation
  • enteroid
  • induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell) (iPSC)
  • intestinal epithelium
  • lgr5
  • organoid
  • stem cells
  • transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology. / Zachos, Nicholas; Kovbasnjuk, Olga N; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E.; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Estes, Mary K.; Donowitz, Mark.

In: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 291, No. 8, 19.02.2016, p. 3759-3766.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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