Human drug discrimination and multiple chemical sensitivity: Caffeine exposure as an experimental model

Thomas Eissenberg, Roland R. Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Multiple chemical sensitivity is a controversial diagnosis. Rigorous, controlled, laboratory-based research can reduce this controversy and lead to potential clinical confirmatory tests. The literature on human caffeine discrimination provides a rigorous methodology that can address reports that patients who suffer multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) are sensitive to usually well-tolerated chemical doses; the studies require patients to discriminate caffeine from placebo under double-blind conditions. Several issues relevant to the conduct of caffeine discrimination studies using MCS patients as subjects are addressed; these issues include study design, determination of safe and tolerable training doses, and discrimination training. Such research will benefit patients and clinicians dealing with a diagnosis of MCS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-513
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental health perspectives
Volume105
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1997

Keywords

  • Caffeine
  • Design issues
  • Discrimination
  • Methodology
  • Multiple chemical sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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