Human d-amphetamine drug discrimination: methamphetamine and hydromorphone.

R. J. Lamb, J. E. Henningfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Standard measures of subjective and discriminative effects of drugs were compared in 5 human volunteers. Subjects responded on a second-order color-tracking procedure, where 30 mg of d-amphetamine served as a discriminative stimulus for one response and its absence as the discriminative stimulus for another response. Self-reported subjective effects were assessed concurrently using the single-dose questionnaire, subscales of the Addiction Research Center Inventory, and several analogue rating scales. On different days following discrimination acquisition, varying doses of d-amphetamine, methamphetamine, and hydromorphone were administered. In these test sessions, either response was reinforced. Methamphetamine and d-amphetamine occasioned dose-related increases in d-amphetamine appropriate responding; hydromorphone did not. Methamphetamine and d-amphetamine occasioned dose-related increases in reports of the drug received being most like "speed"; hydromorphone occasioned dose-related increases in reports of the drug received being most like "dope." All three drugs occasioned dose-related increases in reports of drug liking, and increases in the morphine-benzedrine group, amphetamine, and benzedrine group scales of the Addiction Research Center Inventory. This experiment demonstrated that although explicit discriminative control of behavior by a drug may covary with drug identification, it does not necessarily covary with other self-reported subjective effects. Thus, the complementary nature of the data provided by drug discrimination and standard subjective-effects measures provides quantitative and qualitative data useful in studying both relatively novel compounds and the behavioral biology of psychoactive drugs in general.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-180
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
Volume61
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Hydromorphone
Dextroamphetamine
Methamphetamine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Equipment and Supplies
Behavior Control
Psychotropic Drugs
Amphetamine
Research
Morphine
Volunteers
Color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Human d-amphetamine drug discrimination : methamphetamine and hydromorphone. / Lamb, R. J.; Henningfield, J. E.

In: Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Vol. 61, No. 2, 03.1994, p. 169-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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