Hugs and kisses – The role of motor preferences and emotional lateralization for hemispheric asymmetries in human social touch

Sebastian Ocklenburg, Julian Packheiser, Judith Schmitz, Noemi Rook, Onur Güntürkün, Jutta Peterburs, Gina M. Grimshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Social touch is an important aspect of human social interaction - across all cultures, humans engage in kissing, cradling and embracing. These behaviors are necessarily asymmetric, but the factors that determine their lateralization are not well-understood. Because the hands are often involved in social touch, motor preferences may give rise to asymmetric behavior. However, social touch often occurs in emotional contexts, suggesting that biases might be modulated by asymmetries in emotional processing. Social touch may therefore provide unique insights into lateralized brain networks that link emotion and action. Here, we review the literature on lateralization of cradling, kissing and embracing with respect to motor and emotive bias theories. Lateral biases in all three forms of social touch are influenced, but not fully determined by handedness. Thus, motor bias theory partly explains side biases in social touch. However, emotional context also affects side biases, most strongly for embracing. Taken together, literature analysis reveals that side biases in social touch are most likely determined by a combination of motor and emotive biases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-360
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Touch
Functional Laterality
Interpersonal Relations
Emotions
Hand
Brain

Keywords

  • Cradling
  • Embracing
  • Emotion
  • Handedness
  • Hugging
  • Kissing
  • Laterality
  • Lateralization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Hugs and kisses – The role of motor preferences and emotional lateralization for hemispheric asymmetries in human social touch. / Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Packheiser, Julian; Schmitz, Judith; Rook, Noemi; Güntürkün, Onur; Peterburs, Jutta; Grimshaw, Gina M.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 95, 01.12.2018, p. 353-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ocklenburg, Sebastian ; Packheiser, Julian ; Schmitz, Judith ; Rook, Noemi ; Güntürkün, Onur ; Peterburs, Jutta ; Grimshaw, Gina M. / Hugs and kisses – The role of motor preferences and emotional lateralization for hemispheric asymmetries in human social touch. In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 2018 ; Vol. 95. pp. 353-360.
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