How to teach the potassium hydroxide preparation: a disappearing clinical art form

Bart D. Wilkison, Leonard C. Sperling, Anne P. Spillane, Jon H. Meyerle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using potassium hydroxide (KOH) preparations in the diagnosis of superficial fungal infections is a technique that has been handed down from teacher to apprentice for more than 100 years. The technique is simple, accurate, and inexpensive; however, there is reason to believe it is falling to the wayside in favor of empiric treatment, especially in primary care settings. To continue the use of this valuable diagnostic aid, a system of teaching the KOH preparation to the next generation of physicians (ie, medical students, residents) is proposed with emphasis on facilitating the process by storing viable skin samples infected with dermatophytes for long periods of time. This technique obviates the need to find suitably infected patients before each teaching laboratory. This technique also is appropriate to refresh the skills of practicing physicians as they prepare for point-of-care testing assessments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-112
Number of pages4
JournalCutis
Volume96
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Wilkison, B. D., Sperling, L. C., Spillane, A. P., & Meyerle, J. H. (2015). How to teach the potassium hydroxide preparation: a disappearing clinical art form. Cutis, 96(2), 109-112.