How the HIV Epidemic Carved an Indelible Imprint on Infant Feeding

Hoosen Coovadia, Heena Brahmbhatt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Almost 7 million children younger than age 5 years died in 2012, mostly from preventable diseases. Although, globally, mortality rates for those younger than 5 have declined by almost 50% from 90 deaths in 1990 to 48 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2012, rates in sub-Saharan Africa continue to be unacceptably high at more than 100 deaths per 1,000 live births. One of the millennium development goals is to reduce child mortality by two-thirds by 2015 by reducing the five major causes of child mortality globally: diarrhea, malaria, neonatal infection, pneumonia, and preterm delivery. Malnutrition and lack of safe water contribute to more than half of these child deaths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHealth of HIV Infected People: Food, Nutrition and Lifestyle without Antiretroviral Drugs
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages203-225
Number of pages23
Volume2
ISBN (Print)9780128011416, 9780128007679
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • 4 Prongs approach
  • Breast-feedings
  • Millennium development goals
  • PMTCT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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  • Cite this

    Coovadia, H., & Brahmbhatt, H. (2015). How the HIV Epidemic Carved an Indelible Imprint on Infant Feeding. In Health of HIV Infected People: Food, Nutrition and Lifestyle without Antiretroviral Drugs (Vol. 2, pp. 203-225). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800767-9.00013-3