How reconstructive transplantation is different from organ transplantationand how it is not

T. Hautz, Gerald Brandacher, T. O. Engelhardt, G. Pierer, W P Andrew Lee, J. Pratschke, S. Schneeberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An evolution of understanding and knowledge gained over more than 100 years in the field of solid organ transplantation (SOT) led to the first successful clinical cases of composite tissue allotransplantation. In many ways reconstructive transplantation (RT) is similar to SOT; however, certain characteristics make this novel type of transplantation unique, interesting, and challenging for both clinicians/scientists and patients. Currently, RT is a rapidly advancing multidisciplinary clinical reality. With over 100 clinical cases performed over the past 12 years, and encouraging early to midterm results, the relevance of RT for treatment of congenital and acquired tissue defects unsalvageable by conventional reconstruction is significant and holds great potential for the future. We herein report the extraordinary progress in this field with particular discussion of a comparative analysis of the similarities and differences regarding indications, end point, failure, patient and graft survival, and side effects between SOT and RT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3504-3511
Number of pages8
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume43
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Transplantation
Organ Transplantation
Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation
Graft Survival
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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How reconstructive transplantation is different from organ transplantationand how it is not. / Hautz, T.; Brandacher, Gerald; Engelhardt, T. O.; Pierer, G.; Lee, W P Andrew; Pratschke, J.; Schneeberger, S.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 43, No. 9, 11.2011, p. 3504-3511.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hautz, T. ; Brandacher, Gerald ; Engelhardt, T. O. ; Pierer, G. ; Lee, W P Andrew ; Pratschke, J. ; Schneeberger, S. / How reconstructive transplantation is different from organ transplantationand how it is not. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2011 ; Vol. 43, No. 9. pp. 3504-3511.
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