How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit

Mona Shattell, Robin Bartlett, Kyle Beres, Kelly Southard, Claire Bell, Christine A. Judge, Patricia Duke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses’ and patients’ perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses’ station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses’ station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)398-405
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • acute care
  • engagement
  • environment of care
  • inpatient psychiatric nursing
  • mental health nursing
  • nurse–patient relationship
  • nursing station
  • psychiatric nursing
  • unit safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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