How HIV treatment advances affect the cost-effectiveness of prevention

Steven D. Pinkerton, David R Holtgrave

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. The cost-effectiveness of an HIV prevention program depends, in part, on its potential to avert HIV-related medical care costs. Recent advances in antiretroviral therapy have made HIV/AIDS treatment both more effective and more costly, which might make HIV prevention either more or less cost-effective. The objective of the present study was to explicate the relationship between the effectiveness and costs of HIV treatment and the cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention programs. Methods. A basic analytic framework was used to compare the cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions with respect to different HIV/AIDS medical care scenarios. Algebra was used to calculate a cost-effectiveness threshold that distinguishes prevention programs that become more cost-effective when therapeutic advances simultaneously increase or decrease the cost and effectiveness of treatment from those that become less cost-effective. Recent estimates of the costs and consequences of combination antiretroviral therapy were used to illustrate the calculation method. Results. The advent of combination antiretroviral therapies for HIV has increased the cost- effectiveness of some, but not all, HIV prevention interventions. Conclusions. Whether a particular prevention program becomes more or less cost-effective as a consequence of advancements in the medical treatment of HIV/AIDS depends upon the specific characteristics of both the program and the therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-94
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Decision Making
Volume20
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cost-Benefit Analysis
HIV
Costs and Cost Analysis
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Health Care Costs
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cost-effectiveness analysis
  • HIV prevention
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

How HIV treatment advances affect the cost-effectiveness of prevention. / Pinkerton, Steven D.; Holtgrave, David R.

In: Medical Decision Making, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.2000, p. 89-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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