How glaucoma patient characteristics, self-efficacy and patient-provider communication are associated with eye drop technique

Robyn Sayner, Delesha M. Carpenter, Alan L. Robin, Susan J. Blalock, Kelly W. Muir, Michelle Vitko, Mary Elizabeth Hartnett, Scott D. Lawrence, Annette L. Giangiacomo, Gail Tudor, Jason A. Goldsmith, Betsy Sleath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which patient characteristics, eye drop technique self-efficacy, and ophthalmologist-patient communication about eye drop administration are associated with glaucoma patients' ability to instil a single drop, have the drop land in the eye, and avoid touching the applicator tip of the medication bottle to the eye or face while self-administering eye drops. Methods: Glaucoma patients (n=279) were recruited from six ophthalmology clinics. Medical visits were videotape-recorded. Afterwards, patients were interviewed and demonstrated administering an eye drop on a videotaped-recording. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyse the data. Key findings: Ophthalmologists provided eye drop administration instruction to 40 patients. Patients with more years of education were significantly more likely to both instil a single drop (P=0.017) and have the drop land in their eye (P=0.017). Women were significantly more likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.014). Patients with severe glaucoma (P=0.016), women (P=0.026), and patients who asked at least one eye drop administration question (P=0.001) were significantly less likely to instil a single drop. Patients with arthritis were significantly less likely to have the drop land in their eye (P=0.008). African American patients were significantly less likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.008). Conclusions: Some glaucoma patients have a difficult time self-administering eye drops. As so few patients received eye drop administration instruction from their providers, there is an opportunity for pharmacists to complement care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

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Ophthalmic Solutions
Self Efficacy
Glaucoma
Communication
Applicators
Ophthalmology
Touch
Bottles
Education
Videotape Recording
Aptitude
Pharmacists
African Americans
Arthritis

Keywords

  • Eye drop instillation
  • Glaucoma
  • Patient question-asking
  • Patient-provider communication
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacy

Cite this

How glaucoma patient characteristics, self-efficacy and patient-provider communication are associated with eye drop technique. / Sayner, Robyn; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Robin, Alan L.; Blalock, Susan J.; Muir, Kelly W.; Vitko, Michelle; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Lawrence, Scott D.; Giangiacomo, Annette L.; Tudor, Gail; Goldsmith, Jason A.; Sleath, Betsy.

In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sayner, R, Carpenter, DM, Robin, AL, Blalock, SJ, Muir, KW, Vitko, M, Hartnett, ME, Lawrence, SD, Giangiacomo, AL, Tudor, G, Goldsmith, JA & Sleath, B 2015, 'How glaucoma patient characteristics, self-efficacy and patient-provider communication are associated with eye drop technique', International Journal of Pharmacy Practice. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijpp.12215
Sayner, Robyn ; Carpenter, Delesha M. ; Robin, Alan L. ; Blalock, Susan J. ; Muir, Kelly W. ; Vitko, Michelle ; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth ; Lawrence, Scott D. ; Giangiacomo, Annette L. ; Tudor, Gail ; Goldsmith, Jason A. ; Sleath, Betsy. / How glaucoma patient characteristics, self-efficacy and patient-provider communication are associated with eye drop technique. In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2015.
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abstract = "Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which patient characteristics, eye drop technique self-efficacy, and ophthalmologist-patient communication about eye drop administration are associated with glaucoma patients' ability to instil a single drop, have the drop land in the eye, and avoid touching the applicator tip of the medication bottle to the eye or face while self-administering eye drops. Methods: Glaucoma patients (n=279) were recruited from six ophthalmology clinics. Medical visits were videotape-recorded. Afterwards, patients were interviewed and demonstrated administering an eye drop on a videotaped-recording. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyse the data. Key findings: Ophthalmologists provided eye drop administration instruction to 40 patients. Patients with more years of education were significantly more likely to both instil a single drop (P=0.017) and have the drop land in their eye (P=0.017). Women were significantly more likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.014). Patients with severe glaucoma (P=0.016), women (P=0.026), and patients who asked at least one eye drop administration question (P=0.001) were significantly less likely to instil a single drop. Patients with arthritis were significantly less likely to have the drop land in their eye (P=0.008). African American patients were significantly less likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.008). Conclusions: Some glaucoma patients have a difficult time self-administering eye drops. As so few patients received eye drop administration instruction from their providers, there is an opportunity for pharmacists to complement care.",
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author = "Robyn Sayner and Carpenter, {Delesha M.} and Robin, {Alan L.} and Blalock, {Susan J.} and Muir, {Kelly W.} and Michelle Vitko and Hartnett, {Mary Elizabeth} and Lawrence, {Scott D.} and Giangiacomo, {Annette L.} and Gail Tudor and Goldsmith, {Jason A.} and Betsy Sleath",
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AU - Sayner, Robyn

AU - Carpenter, Delesha M.

AU - Robin, Alan L.

AU - Blalock, Susan J.

AU - Muir, Kelly W.

AU - Vitko, Michelle

AU - Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth

AU - Lawrence, Scott D.

AU - Giangiacomo, Annette L.

AU - Tudor, Gail

AU - Goldsmith, Jason A.

AU - Sleath, Betsy

PY - 2015

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N2 - Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which patient characteristics, eye drop technique self-efficacy, and ophthalmologist-patient communication about eye drop administration are associated with glaucoma patients' ability to instil a single drop, have the drop land in the eye, and avoid touching the applicator tip of the medication bottle to the eye or face while self-administering eye drops. Methods: Glaucoma patients (n=279) were recruited from six ophthalmology clinics. Medical visits were videotape-recorded. Afterwards, patients were interviewed and demonstrated administering an eye drop on a videotaped-recording. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyse the data. Key findings: Ophthalmologists provided eye drop administration instruction to 40 patients. Patients with more years of education were significantly more likely to both instil a single drop (P=0.017) and have the drop land in their eye (P=0.017). Women were significantly more likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.014). Patients with severe glaucoma (P=0.016), women (P=0.026), and patients who asked at least one eye drop administration question (P=0.001) were significantly less likely to instil a single drop. Patients with arthritis were significantly less likely to have the drop land in their eye (P=0.008). African American patients were significantly less likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.008). Conclusions: Some glaucoma patients have a difficult time self-administering eye drops. As so few patients received eye drop administration instruction from their providers, there is an opportunity for pharmacists to complement care.

AB - Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which patient characteristics, eye drop technique self-efficacy, and ophthalmologist-patient communication about eye drop administration are associated with glaucoma patients' ability to instil a single drop, have the drop land in the eye, and avoid touching the applicator tip of the medication bottle to the eye or face while self-administering eye drops. Methods: Glaucoma patients (n=279) were recruited from six ophthalmology clinics. Medical visits were videotape-recorded. Afterwards, patients were interviewed and demonstrated administering an eye drop on a videotaped-recording. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyse the data. Key findings: Ophthalmologists provided eye drop administration instruction to 40 patients. Patients with more years of education were significantly more likely to both instil a single drop (P=0.017) and have the drop land in their eye (P=0.017). Women were significantly more likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.014). Patients with severe glaucoma (P=0.016), women (P=0.026), and patients who asked at least one eye drop administration question (P=0.001) were significantly less likely to instil a single drop. Patients with arthritis were significantly less likely to have the drop land in their eye (P=0.008). African American patients were significantly less likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P=0.008). Conclusions: Some glaucoma patients have a difficult time self-administering eye drops. As so few patients received eye drop administration instruction from their providers, there is an opportunity for pharmacists to complement care.

KW - Eye drop instillation

KW - Glaucoma

KW - Patient question-asking

KW - Patient-provider communication

KW - Self-efficacy

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