How functional network connectivity changes as a result of lesion and recovery: An investigation of the network phenotype of stroke

Yuan Tao, Brenda Rapp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study, through a series of univariate and multivariate (classification) analyses, investigated fMRI task-based functional connectivity (FC) at pre- and post-treatment time-points in 18 individuals with chronic post-stroke dysgraphia. The investigation examined the effects of lesion and treatment-based recovery on functional organization, focusing on both inter-hemispheric (homotopic) and intra-hemispheric connectivity. The work confirmed, in the chronic stage, the “network phenotype of stroke injury” proposed by Siegel et al. (2016) consisting of abnormally low inter-hemispheric connectivity as well as abnormally high intra-hemispheric (ipsilesional) connectivity. In terms of recovery-based changes in FC, this study found overall hyper-normalization of these abnormal inter and intra-hemispheric connectivity patterns, suggestive of over-correction. Specifically, treatment-related homotopic FC increases were observed between left and right dorsal frontal-parietal regions. With regard to intra-hemispheric connections, recovery was dominated by increased ipsilateral connectivity between frontal and parietal regions along with decreased connectivity between the frontal regions and posterior parietal-occipital-temporal areas. Both inter and intra-hemispheric changes were associated with treatment-driven improvements in spelling performance. We suggest an interpretation according to which, with treatment, as posterior orthographic processing areas become more effective, executive control from frontal-parietal networks becomes less necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-41
Number of pages25
JournalCortex
Volume131
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Functional connectivity
  • Functional network
  • Language deficit
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Stroke recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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