How does a Social and Behavioral Change Communication Intervention Predict Menstrual Health and Hygiene Management

A Cross-Sectional Study

Astha Ramaiya, Alka Malhotra, Carmen Cronin, Sarah Stevens, Kelli Kostizak, Animesh Sharma, Shailesh Nagar, Suruchi Sood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Interventions in India to improve menstrual health and hygiene management (MHHM) have been implemented at the national, state, district and school level. However, evaluations of these interventions have been scarce. The objective of the study was to determine if a social and behavioral change communication (SBCC) intervention (GARIMA) had a relationship with knowledge, attitudes, interpersonal communication, restrictions and MHHM using a comparison group post-test only design among 2206 adolescent girls. Methods: Intervention villages and adolescent girls were selected through stratified random sampling based on where GARIMA was implemented. Villages and adolescent girls in comparison villages were matched socio-demographically to intervention villages and adolescent girls. Multi-level logistic regressions assessed the relationship between the encoded exposure, mediators and MHHM. Results: The results showed that the encoded exposure predicted all behaviors corresponding to MHHM. Additionally, adolescent girls in the high encoded exposure group had significantly higher knowledge about puberty and reproductive parts (AOR: 2.03 (95% CI: 1.31 - 3.15)), positive attitudes towards gender (AOR: 1.48 (95% CI: 1.02 - 2.16)) and higher levels of some discussion and dialogue (AOR: 1.41 (95% CI: 1.04 - 1.92)). Conclusions: Future programs should use SBCC to improve MHHM behavior but involve families, peers and community members to a greater extent in order to improve attitudes towards menstruation, attitudes towards restrictions, attitudes towards absorbent use and reduce restrictions within the community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1039
JournalBMC public health
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2019

Fingerprint

Hygiene
Cross-Sectional Studies
Communication
Health
Menstruation
Puberty
India
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • adolescent girls
  • India
  • menstrual health and hygiene management
  • menstrual hygiene management
  • SBCC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

How does a Social and Behavioral Change Communication Intervention Predict Menstrual Health and Hygiene Management : A Cross-Sectional Study. / Ramaiya, Astha; Malhotra, Alka; Cronin, Carmen; Stevens, Sarah; Kostizak, Kelli; Sharma, Animesh; Nagar, Shailesh; Sood, Suruchi.

In: BMC public health, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1039, 02.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramaiya, Astha ; Malhotra, Alka ; Cronin, Carmen ; Stevens, Sarah ; Kostizak, Kelli ; Sharma, Animesh ; Nagar, Shailesh ; Sood, Suruchi. / How does a Social and Behavioral Change Communication Intervention Predict Menstrual Health and Hygiene Management : A Cross-Sectional Study. In: BMC public health. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
@article{7fc53df46b90487ab234078928ba10a1,
title = "How does a Social and Behavioral Change Communication Intervention Predict Menstrual Health and Hygiene Management: A Cross-Sectional Study",
abstract = "Background: Interventions in India to improve menstrual health and hygiene management (MHHM) have been implemented at the national, state, district and school level. However, evaluations of these interventions have been scarce. The objective of the study was to determine if a social and behavioral change communication (SBCC) intervention (GARIMA) had a relationship with knowledge, attitudes, interpersonal communication, restrictions and MHHM using a comparison group post-test only design among 2206 adolescent girls. Methods: Intervention villages and adolescent girls were selected through stratified random sampling based on where GARIMA was implemented. Villages and adolescent girls in comparison villages were matched socio-demographically to intervention villages and adolescent girls. Multi-level logistic regressions assessed the relationship between the encoded exposure, mediators and MHHM. Results: The results showed that the encoded exposure predicted all behaviors corresponding to MHHM. Additionally, adolescent girls in the high encoded exposure group had significantly higher knowledge about puberty and reproductive parts (AOR: 2.03 (95{\%} CI: 1.31 - 3.15)), positive attitudes towards gender (AOR: 1.48 (95{\%} CI: 1.02 - 2.16)) and higher levels of some discussion and dialogue (AOR: 1.41 (95{\%} CI: 1.04 - 1.92)). Conclusions: Future programs should use SBCC to improve MHHM behavior but involve families, peers and community members to a greater extent in order to improve attitudes towards menstruation, attitudes towards restrictions, attitudes towards absorbent use and reduce restrictions within the community.",
keywords = "adolescent girls, India, menstrual health and hygiene management, menstrual hygiene management, SBCC",
author = "Astha Ramaiya and Alka Malhotra and Carmen Cronin and Sarah Stevens and Kelli Kostizak and Animesh Sharma and Shailesh Nagar and Suruchi Sood",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1186/s12889-019-7359-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How does a Social and Behavioral Change Communication Intervention Predict Menstrual Health and Hygiene Management

T2 - A Cross-Sectional Study

AU - Ramaiya, Astha

AU - Malhotra, Alka

AU - Cronin, Carmen

AU - Stevens, Sarah

AU - Kostizak, Kelli

AU - Sharma, Animesh

AU - Nagar, Shailesh

AU - Sood, Suruchi

PY - 2019/8/2

Y1 - 2019/8/2

N2 - Background: Interventions in India to improve menstrual health and hygiene management (MHHM) have been implemented at the national, state, district and school level. However, evaluations of these interventions have been scarce. The objective of the study was to determine if a social and behavioral change communication (SBCC) intervention (GARIMA) had a relationship with knowledge, attitudes, interpersonal communication, restrictions and MHHM using a comparison group post-test only design among 2206 adolescent girls. Methods: Intervention villages and adolescent girls were selected through stratified random sampling based on where GARIMA was implemented. Villages and adolescent girls in comparison villages were matched socio-demographically to intervention villages and adolescent girls. Multi-level logistic regressions assessed the relationship between the encoded exposure, mediators and MHHM. Results: The results showed that the encoded exposure predicted all behaviors corresponding to MHHM. Additionally, adolescent girls in the high encoded exposure group had significantly higher knowledge about puberty and reproductive parts (AOR: 2.03 (95% CI: 1.31 - 3.15)), positive attitudes towards gender (AOR: 1.48 (95% CI: 1.02 - 2.16)) and higher levels of some discussion and dialogue (AOR: 1.41 (95% CI: 1.04 - 1.92)). Conclusions: Future programs should use SBCC to improve MHHM behavior but involve families, peers and community members to a greater extent in order to improve attitudes towards menstruation, attitudes towards restrictions, attitudes towards absorbent use and reduce restrictions within the community.

AB - Background: Interventions in India to improve menstrual health and hygiene management (MHHM) have been implemented at the national, state, district and school level. However, evaluations of these interventions have been scarce. The objective of the study was to determine if a social and behavioral change communication (SBCC) intervention (GARIMA) had a relationship with knowledge, attitudes, interpersonal communication, restrictions and MHHM using a comparison group post-test only design among 2206 adolescent girls. Methods: Intervention villages and adolescent girls were selected through stratified random sampling based on where GARIMA was implemented. Villages and adolescent girls in comparison villages were matched socio-demographically to intervention villages and adolescent girls. Multi-level logistic regressions assessed the relationship between the encoded exposure, mediators and MHHM. Results: The results showed that the encoded exposure predicted all behaviors corresponding to MHHM. Additionally, adolescent girls in the high encoded exposure group had significantly higher knowledge about puberty and reproductive parts (AOR: 2.03 (95% CI: 1.31 - 3.15)), positive attitudes towards gender (AOR: 1.48 (95% CI: 1.02 - 2.16)) and higher levels of some discussion and dialogue (AOR: 1.41 (95% CI: 1.04 - 1.92)). Conclusions: Future programs should use SBCC to improve MHHM behavior but involve families, peers and community members to a greater extent in order to improve attitudes towards menstruation, attitudes towards restrictions, attitudes towards absorbent use and reduce restrictions within the community.

KW - adolescent girls

KW - India

KW - menstrual health and hygiene management

KW - menstrual hygiene management

KW - SBCC

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070196034&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85070196034&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-019-7359-z

DO - 10.1186/s12889-019-7359-z

M3 - Article

VL - 19

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

IS - 1

M1 - 1039

ER -