How Do We Manage Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia? A Survey of Clinical Practice Trends for Gastrointestinal Endoscopists in the United States

R. Brooks Vance, Nisa Kubiliun, Kerry B. Dunbar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is an accepted pathologic precursor to gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). While surveillance of GIM in Europe and Asia is common, only limited recommendations related to endoscopic surveillance of GIM exist in the United States. Aim: To understand the clinical practice patterns of US gastroenterologists in the management and endoscopic surveillance of GIM. Methods: A 23 item survey was developed to explore endoscopists’ opinions regarding the surveillance of GIM and knowledge of current guidelines. Eight clinical vignettes were developed to address specific clinical scenarios where endoscopic surveillance of GIM might be considered. Results: There were 227 respondents, with 60 % working primarily in the private sector and 40 % in academic medicine. While 68 % of the respondents refer to major society guidelines for guidance in patient management, almost 78 % of endoscopist responders believe that there are no specific US guidelines pertaining to surveillance of GIM. Only two-thirds of respondents believe that based on current data, patients at increased risk of GAC should be a part of an endoscopic surveillance program, while 15 % believe all patients with GIM should receive endoscopic surveillance. Respondents use a wide range of biopsy techniques and surveillance intervals for patients with GIM, with no consistent pattern of practice identified. Conclusions: There is variability in the knowledge and practice patterns of US endoscopists related to surveillance of gastric intestinal metaplasia. In the absence of detailed US GI society guidelines, many endoscopists perform surveillance endoscopy on patients with GIM using variable biopsy techniques and surveillance intervals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 17 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Metaplasia
Stomach
Guidelines
Surveys and Questionnaires
Adenocarcinoma
Physicians' Practice Patterns
Biopsy
Private Sector
Endoscopy
Medicine

Keywords

  • Endoscopy
  • Gastric cancer
  • Gastric intestinal metaplasia
  • Stomach
  • Surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology

Cite this

How Do We Manage Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia? A Survey of Clinical Practice Trends for Gastrointestinal Endoscopists in the United States. / Vance, R. Brooks; Kubiliun, Nisa; Dunbar, Kerry B.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 17.03.2016, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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