How accurate are self-reports? Analysis of self-reported health care utilization and absence when compared with administrative data

Meghan E. Short, Ronnie Goetzel, Xiaofei Pei, Maryam J. Tabrizi, Ronald J. Ozminkowski, Teresa B. Gibson, Dave M. DeJoy, Mark G. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of self-reported health care utilization and absence reported on health risk assessments against administrative claims and human resource records. METHODS: Self-reported values of health care utilization and absenteeism were analyzed for concordance to administrative claims values. Percent agreement, Pearson's correlations, and multivariate logistic regression models examined the level of agreement and characteristics of participants with concordance. RESULTS: Self-report and administrative data showed greater concordance for monthly compared with yearly health care utilization metrics. Percent agreement ranged from 30% to 99% with annual doctor visits having the lowest percent agreement. Younger people, males, those with higher education, and healthier individuals more accurately reported their health care utilization and absenteeism. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported health care utilization and absenteeism may be used as a proxy when medical claims and administrative data are unavailable, particularly for shorter recall periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)786-796
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Self Report
Absenteeism
Logistic Models
Proxy
Education
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

How accurate are self-reports? Analysis of self-reported health care utilization and absence when compared with administrative data. / Short, Meghan E.; Goetzel, Ronnie; Pei, Xiaofei; Tabrizi, Maryam J.; Ozminkowski, Ronald J.; Gibson, Teresa B.; DeJoy, Dave M.; Wilson, Mark G.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 51, No. 7, 07.2009, p. 786-796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Short, Meghan E. ; Goetzel, Ronnie ; Pei, Xiaofei ; Tabrizi, Maryam J. ; Ozminkowski, Ronald J. ; Gibson, Teresa B. ; DeJoy, Dave M. ; Wilson, Mark G. / How accurate are self-reports? Analysis of self-reported health care utilization and absence when compared with administrative data. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 51, No. 7. pp. 786-796.
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