Housing and allergens: A pooled analysis of nine U.S. studies

Jonathan Wilson, David E. Jacobs, Sherry Dixon, Patrick Breysse

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Housing conditions can contribute to allergen exposures that are linked to asthma. We pooled allergen, housing condition, occupant behavior, demographic, and other data from nine asthma studies (n= 950 homes in 6 US cities). Common allergens were measured in settled dust from kitchens or bedrooms. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) for clinically significant allergen levels were estimated. High cockroach allergen was associated with cracks or holes in walls (OR = 2.1), high dust mite allergen was associated with mold odor (OR=2.5), housing built before 1951 (OR=2.1), and single-family home with slab on grade (OR=1.9); and mouse allergen was associated with rodent control or signs of rodents (OR=3.62) and inversely associated with presence of a cat (OR=0.20). This study indicates that screening for housing-based asthma triggers should include presence of cats, dogs, cockroaches, or rodents; water leaks; mold or mold odor; holes or cracks in walls; and below average housekeeping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Event9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009 - Syracuse, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 13 2009Sep 17 2009

Other

Other9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySyracuse, NY
Period9/13/099/17/09

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Keywords

  • Allergens
  • Asthma
  • HB2009
  • Housekeeping
  • Housing
  • Mold

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Wilson, J., Jacobs, D. E., Dixon, S., & Breysse, P. (2009). Housing and allergens: A pooled analysis of nine U.S. studies. Paper presented at 9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009, Syracuse, NY, United States.