Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases

William Yang, Christopher W. Woods, Ephraim L. Tsalik

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The field of infectious diseases is witnessing the rapid evolution of molecular diagnostics, mostly focused on pathogen detection. However, targeting the host response for diagnostic and prognostic purposes has been described as a paradigm shift (Ramilo & Mejias, 2009). The concept of host response is not new. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate described in 1917 and C-reactive protein in 1930 are still used today albeit with limitations. More contemporary biomarkers based on known biology include procalcitonin, cytokines, and lactate. However, completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 triggered the rapid pace of discovery we see today. This has set the stage for various 'omic technologies to identify new biomarkers from these unbiased systems biology approaches. The massive streams of data associated with omics impose their own challenges, spurring developments in statistics, bioinformatics, and computing. Fortunately, the availability of data and the means to process it have converged, creating the right environment for host-based molecular diagnostics in infectious diseases to flourish. Transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics constitute the major tools to identify host-response biomarkers of infectious diseases. Specifically, research generated by these approaches has led to the development of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasite pathogen class diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCurrent and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015
EditorsAndrew Sails, Yi-Wei Tang
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
Pages465-500
Number of pages36
ISBN (Print)9780128032978
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMethods in Microbiology
Volume42
ISSN (Print)0580-9517

Fingerprint

Communicable Diseases
Biomarkers
Molecular Pathology
Human Genome Project
Metabolomics
Systems Biology
Blood Sedimentation
Calcitonin
Computational Biology
C-Reactive Protein
Proteomics
Lactic Acid
Parasites
Cytokines
Technology
Research

Keywords

  • Computational biology
  • Diagnostic biomarkers
  • Gene expression profiling
  • Genomics
  • Host-pathogen interactions
  • Metabolomics
  • Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Yang, W., Woods, C. W., & Tsalik, E. L. (2015). Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases. In A. Sails, & Y-W. Tang (Eds.), Current and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015 (pp. 465-500). (Methods in Microbiology; Vol. 42). Academic Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.mim.2015.06.001

Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases. / Yang, William; Woods, Christopher W.; Tsalik, Ephraim L.

Current and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015. ed. / Andrew Sails; Yi-Wei Tang. Academic Press Inc., 2015. p. 465-500 (Methods in Microbiology; Vol. 42).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yang, W, Woods, CW & Tsalik, EL 2015, Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases. in A Sails & Y-W Tang (eds), Current and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015. Methods in Microbiology, vol. 42, Academic Press Inc., pp. 465-500. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.mim.2015.06.001
Yang W, Woods CW, Tsalik EL. Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases. In Sails A, Tang Y-W, editors, Current and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015. Academic Press Inc. 2015. p. 465-500. (Methods in Microbiology). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.mim.2015.06.001
Yang, William ; Woods, Christopher W. ; Tsalik, Ephraim L. / Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases. Current and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015. editor / Andrew Sails ; Yi-Wei Tang. Academic Press Inc., 2015. pp. 465-500 (Methods in Microbiology).
@inproceedings{b94da719add343db890fa7f28b91b171,
title = "Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases",
abstract = "The field of infectious diseases is witnessing the rapid evolution of molecular diagnostics, mostly focused on pathogen detection. However, targeting the host response for diagnostic and prognostic purposes has been described as a paradigm shift (Ramilo & Mejias, 2009). The concept of host response is not new. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate described in 1917 and C-reactive protein in 1930 are still used today albeit with limitations. More contemporary biomarkers based on known biology include procalcitonin, cytokines, and lactate. However, completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 triggered the rapid pace of discovery we see today. This has set the stage for various 'omic technologies to identify new biomarkers from these unbiased systems biology approaches. The massive streams of data associated with omics impose their own challenges, spurring developments in statistics, bioinformatics, and computing. Fortunately, the availability of data and the means to process it have converged, creating the right environment for host-based molecular diagnostics in infectious diseases to flourish. Transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics constitute the major tools to identify host-response biomarkers of infectious diseases. Specifically, research generated by these approaches has led to the development of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasite pathogen class diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.",
keywords = "Computational biology, Diagnostic biomarkers, Gene expression profiling, Genomics, Host-pathogen interactions, Metabolomics, Proteomics",
author = "William Yang and Woods, {Christopher W.} and Tsalik, {Ephraim L.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/bs.mim.2015.06.001",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780128032978",
series = "Methods in Microbiology",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
pages = "465--500",
editor = "Andrew Sails and Yi-Wei Tang",
booktitle = "Current and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Host-based diagnostics for detection and prognosis of infectious diseases

AU - Yang, William

AU - Woods, Christopher W.

AU - Tsalik, Ephraim L.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - The field of infectious diseases is witnessing the rapid evolution of molecular diagnostics, mostly focused on pathogen detection. However, targeting the host response for diagnostic and prognostic purposes has been described as a paradigm shift (Ramilo & Mejias, 2009). The concept of host response is not new. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate described in 1917 and C-reactive protein in 1930 are still used today albeit with limitations. More contemporary biomarkers based on known biology include procalcitonin, cytokines, and lactate. However, completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 triggered the rapid pace of discovery we see today. This has set the stage for various 'omic technologies to identify new biomarkers from these unbiased systems biology approaches. The massive streams of data associated with omics impose their own challenges, spurring developments in statistics, bioinformatics, and computing. Fortunately, the availability of data and the means to process it have converged, creating the right environment for host-based molecular diagnostics in infectious diseases to flourish. Transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics constitute the major tools to identify host-response biomarkers of infectious diseases. Specifically, research generated by these approaches has led to the development of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasite pathogen class diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

AB - The field of infectious diseases is witnessing the rapid evolution of molecular diagnostics, mostly focused on pathogen detection. However, targeting the host response for diagnostic and prognostic purposes has been described as a paradigm shift (Ramilo & Mejias, 2009). The concept of host response is not new. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate described in 1917 and C-reactive protein in 1930 are still used today albeit with limitations. More contemporary biomarkers based on known biology include procalcitonin, cytokines, and lactate. However, completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 triggered the rapid pace of discovery we see today. This has set the stage for various 'omic technologies to identify new biomarkers from these unbiased systems biology approaches. The massive streams of data associated with omics impose their own challenges, spurring developments in statistics, bioinformatics, and computing. Fortunately, the availability of data and the means to process it have converged, creating the right environment for host-based molecular diagnostics in infectious diseases to flourish. Transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics constitute the major tools to identify host-response biomarkers of infectious diseases. Specifically, research generated by these approaches has led to the development of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasite pathogen class diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

KW - Computational biology

KW - Diagnostic biomarkers

KW - Gene expression profiling

KW - Genomics

KW - Host-pathogen interactions

KW - Metabolomics

KW - Proteomics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84937053691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84937053691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/bs.mim.2015.06.001

DO - 10.1016/bs.mim.2015.06.001

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84937053691

SN - 9780128032978

T3 - Methods in Microbiology

SP - 465

EP - 500

BT - Current and Emerging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Microbial Infections, 2015

A2 - Sails, Andrew

A2 - Tang, Yi-Wei

PB - Academic Press Inc.

ER -