Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections

Adena Greenbaum, Jufu Chen, Carrie Reed, Suzanne Beavers, David Callahan, Deborah Christensen, Lyn Finelli, Alicia M. Fry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) among children have been well characterized. We characterized hospitalizations for severe LRTI among children.

METHODS: We analyzed claims data from commercial and Medicaid insurance enrollees (MarketScan) ages 0 to 18 years from 2007 to 2011. LRTI hospitalizations were identified by the first 2 listed International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision discharge codes; those with ICU admission and/or receiving mechanical ventilation were defined as severe LRTI. Underlying conditions were determined from out- and inpatient discharge codes in the preceding year. We report insurance specific and combined rates that used both commercial and Medicaid rates and adjusted for age and insurance status.

RESULTS: During 2007-2011, we identified 16 797 and 12 053 severe LRTI hospitalizations among commercial and Medicaid enrollees, respectively. The rates of severe LRTI hospitalizations per 100 000 person-years were highest in children aged <1 year (commercial: 244; Medicaid: 372, respectively), and decreased with age. Among commercial enrollees, ≥1 condition increased the risk for severe LRTI (1 condition: adjusted relative risk, 2.68; 95% confidence interval, 2.58-2.78; 3 conditions: adjusted relative risk, 4.85; 95% confidence interval, 4.65-5.07) compared with children with no medical conditions. Using commercial/Medicaid combined rates, an estimated 31 289 hospitalizations for severe LRTI occurred each year in children in the United States.

CONCLUSIONS: Among children, the burden of hospitalization for severe LRTI is greatest among children aged <1 year. Children with underlying medical conditions are at greatest risk for severe LRTI hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)546-554
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume134
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Respiratory Tract Infections
Hospitalization
Medicaid
Insurance
Confidence Intervals
Insurance Coverage
International Classification of Diseases
Artificial Respiration
Inpatients
Outpatients

Keywords

  • Children
  • Hospitalizations
  • Severe respiratory tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Greenbaum, A., Chen, J., Reed, C., Beavers, S., Callahan, D., Christensen, D., ... Fry, A. M. (2014). Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections. Pediatrics, 134(3), 546-554. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-0244

Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections. / Greenbaum, Adena; Chen, Jufu; Reed, Carrie; Beavers, Suzanne; Callahan, David; Christensen, Deborah; Finelli, Lyn; Fry, Alicia M.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 134, No. 3, 01.09.2014, p. 546-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenbaum, A, Chen, J, Reed, C, Beavers, S, Callahan, D, Christensen, D, Finelli, L & Fry, AM 2014, 'Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections', Pediatrics, vol. 134, no. 3, pp. 546-554. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-0244
Greenbaum A, Chen J, Reed C, Beavers S, Callahan D, Christensen D et al. Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections. Pediatrics. 2014 Sep 1;134(3):546-554. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-0244
Greenbaum, Adena ; Chen, Jufu ; Reed, Carrie ; Beavers, Suzanne ; Callahan, David ; Christensen, Deborah ; Finelli, Lyn ; Fry, Alicia M. / Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections. In: Pediatrics. 2014 ; Vol. 134, No. 3. pp. 546-554.
@article{dc7b1e19d8454661a148e8d73ec6ae03,
title = "Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) among children have been well characterized. We characterized hospitalizations for severe LRTI among children.METHODS: We analyzed claims data from commercial and Medicaid insurance enrollees (MarketScan) ages 0 to 18 years from 2007 to 2011. LRTI hospitalizations were identified by the first 2 listed International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision discharge codes; those with ICU admission and/or receiving mechanical ventilation were defined as severe LRTI. Underlying conditions were determined from out- and inpatient discharge codes in the preceding year. We report insurance specific and combined rates that used both commercial and Medicaid rates and adjusted for age and insurance status.RESULTS: During 2007-2011, we identified 16 797 and 12 053 severe LRTI hospitalizations among commercial and Medicaid enrollees, respectively. The rates of severe LRTI hospitalizations per 100 000 person-years were highest in children aged <1 year (commercial: 244; Medicaid: 372, respectively), and decreased with age. Among commercial enrollees, ≥1 condition increased the risk for severe LRTI (1 condition: adjusted relative risk, 2.68; 95{\%} confidence interval, 2.58-2.78; 3 conditions: adjusted relative risk, 4.85; 95{\%} confidence interval, 4.65-5.07) compared with children with no medical conditions. Using commercial/Medicaid combined rates, an estimated 31 289 hospitalizations for severe LRTI occurred each year in children in the United States.CONCLUSIONS: Among children, the burden of hospitalization for severe LRTI is greatest among children aged <1 year. Children with underlying medical conditions are at greatest risk for severe LRTI hospitalization.",
keywords = "Children, Hospitalizations, Severe respiratory tract infection",
author = "Adena Greenbaum and Jufu Chen and Carrie Reed and Suzanne Beavers and David Callahan and Deborah Christensen and Lyn Finelli and Fry, {Alicia M.}",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2014-0244",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "134",
pages = "546--554",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hospitalizations for severe lower respiratory tract infections

AU - Greenbaum, Adena

AU - Chen, Jufu

AU - Reed, Carrie

AU - Beavers, Suzanne

AU - Callahan, David

AU - Christensen, Deborah

AU - Finelli, Lyn

AU - Fry, Alicia M.

PY - 2014/9/1

Y1 - 2014/9/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) among children have been well characterized. We characterized hospitalizations for severe LRTI among children.METHODS: We analyzed claims data from commercial and Medicaid insurance enrollees (MarketScan) ages 0 to 18 years from 2007 to 2011. LRTI hospitalizations were identified by the first 2 listed International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision discharge codes; those with ICU admission and/or receiving mechanical ventilation were defined as severe LRTI. Underlying conditions were determined from out- and inpatient discharge codes in the preceding year. We report insurance specific and combined rates that used both commercial and Medicaid rates and adjusted for age and insurance status.RESULTS: During 2007-2011, we identified 16 797 and 12 053 severe LRTI hospitalizations among commercial and Medicaid enrollees, respectively. The rates of severe LRTI hospitalizations per 100 000 person-years were highest in children aged <1 year (commercial: 244; Medicaid: 372, respectively), and decreased with age. Among commercial enrollees, ≥1 condition increased the risk for severe LRTI (1 condition: adjusted relative risk, 2.68; 95% confidence interval, 2.58-2.78; 3 conditions: adjusted relative risk, 4.85; 95% confidence interval, 4.65-5.07) compared with children with no medical conditions. Using commercial/Medicaid combined rates, an estimated 31 289 hospitalizations for severe LRTI occurred each year in children in the United States.CONCLUSIONS: Among children, the burden of hospitalization for severe LRTI is greatest among children aged <1 year. Children with underlying medical conditions are at greatest risk for severe LRTI hospitalization.

AB - BACKGROUND: Hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) among children have been well characterized. We characterized hospitalizations for severe LRTI among children.METHODS: We analyzed claims data from commercial and Medicaid insurance enrollees (MarketScan) ages 0 to 18 years from 2007 to 2011. LRTI hospitalizations were identified by the first 2 listed International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision discharge codes; those with ICU admission and/or receiving mechanical ventilation were defined as severe LRTI. Underlying conditions were determined from out- and inpatient discharge codes in the preceding year. We report insurance specific and combined rates that used both commercial and Medicaid rates and adjusted for age and insurance status.RESULTS: During 2007-2011, we identified 16 797 and 12 053 severe LRTI hospitalizations among commercial and Medicaid enrollees, respectively. The rates of severe LRTI hospitalizations per 100 000 person-years were highest in children aged <1 year (commercial: 244; Medicaid: 372, respectively), and decreased with age. Among commercial enrollees, ≥1 condition increased the risk for severe LRTI (1 condition: adjusted relative risk, 2.68; 95% confidence interval, 2.58-2.78; 3 conditions: adjusted relative risk, 4.85; 95% confidence interval, 4.65-5.07) compared with children with no medical conditions. Using commercial/Medicaid combined rates, an estimated 31 289 hospitalizations for severe LRTI occurred each year in children in the United States.CONCLUSIONS: Among children, the burden of hospitalization for severe LRTI is greatest among children aged <1 year. Children with underlying medical conditions are at greatest risk for severe LRTI hospitalization.

KW - Children

KW - Hospitalizations

KW - Severe respiratory tract infection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907196944&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907196944&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2014-0244

DO - 10.1542/peds.2014-0244

M3 - Article

C2 - 25113302

AN - SCOPUS:84907196944

VL - 134

SP - 546

EP - 554

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 3

ER -