Hospital Readmission and Costs of Total Knee Replacement Surgery in 2009 and 2014: Potential Implications for Health Care Managers

Michael P. Cary, Victoria Goode, Nancy Crego, Deirdre Thornlow, Cathleen Colón-Emeric, Courtney Van Houtven, Elizabeth I. Merwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to describe changes in hospital readmissions and costs for US hospital patients who underwent total knee replacement (TKR) in 2009 and 2014. Data came from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project net-Nationwide Readmissions Database. Compared with 2009, overall 30-day rates of readmissions after TKR decreased by 15% in 2014. Rates varied by demographics: readmission rates were lower for younger patients, males, Medicare recipients, and those with higher incomes. Overall, costs rose 20% across TKR groups. This report is among the first to describe changes in hospital readmissions and costs for TKR patients in a national sample of US acute care hospitals. Findings offer hospital managers a mechanism to benchmark their facilities' performances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-28
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Care Manager
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • health services research
  • hospital readmissions
  • national health policy
  • quality improvement
  • total knee replacement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning

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