Hope as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Interpersonal Predictors of Suicide and Suicidal Thinking in African Americans

David W. Hollingsworth, La Ricka R. Wingate, Raymond P. Tucker, Victoria M. O’Keefe, Ashley B. Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Suicide is currently the third leading cause of death of African Americans between the ages of 15 and 24 years. Possible risk factors of suicidal ideation for this population include the two interpersonal constructs of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide, perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness. Past research has demonstrated that hope is negatively associated with each of these two constructs of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide and suicidal ideation. The aim of the current study was to investigate hope as a moderator between both thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness and suicidal ideation in a sample of 107 African American college students. Results supported the hypotheses, as hope moderated the relationship between thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation and perceived burdensomeness and suicidal ideation. This study suggests that African Americans who endorse high levels of hope are at a lower risk for suicidal thoughts when having perceptions of being a burden and not belonging. Clinical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-190
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Black Psychology
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • hope
  • perceived burdensomeness
  • suicidal ideation
  • thwarted belongingness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Applied Psychology

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