HLA and HIV-1: Heterozygote advantage and B*35-Cw*04 disadvantage

Mary Carrington, George W. Nelson, Maureen P. Martin, Teri Kissner, David Vlahov, James J. Goedert, Richard Kaslow, Susan Buchbinder, Keith Hoots, Stephen J. O'Brien

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    A selective advantage against infectious disease associated with increased heterozygosity at the human major histocompatibility complex [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II] is believed to play a major role in maintaining the extraordinary allelic diversity of these genes. maximum HLA heterozygosity of class I loci (A, B, and C) delayed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) onset among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1), whereas individuals who were homozygous for one or more loci progressed rapidly to AIDS and death. The HLA class I alleles B*35 and Cw*04 were consistently associated with rapid development of AIDS-defining conditions in Caucasians. The extended survival of 28 to 40 percent of HIV-1-infected Caucasian patients who avoided AIDS for ten or more years can be attributed to their being fully heterozygous at HLA class I loci, to their lacking the AIDS-associated alleles B*35 and Cw*04, or to both.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1748-1752
    Number of pages5
    JournalScience
    Volume283
    Issue number5408
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 12 1999

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

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    Carrington, M., Nelson, G. W., Martin, M. P., Kissner, T., Vlahov, D., Goedert, J. J., Kaslow, R., Buchbinder, S., Hoots, K., & O'Brien, S. J. (1999). HLA and HIV-1: Heterozygote advantage and B*35-Cw*04 disadvantage. Science, 283(5408), 1748-1752. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.283.5408.1748