HIV/AIDS care and treatment in three provinces in northern Thailand before the national scale-up of highly-active antiretroviral therapy

Sombat Thanprasertsuk, Cheewanan Lertpiriyasuwat, Tasana Leusaree, Petchsri Sirinirund, Surin Sumanapan, Chonlisa Chariyalertsak, Nicole Simmons, Tedd V. Ellerbrock, Taweesap Siraprapasiri, Chiraporn Yachompoo, Saowanee Panputtanakul, Pongsri Virapat, Panpaka Supakalin, Kriengkrai Srithaniviboonchai, Philip Mock, Somsak Supawitkul, Jordan W. Tappero, William C. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 2003, Thailand launched a program to place 50,000 persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) by the end of 2004, following a series of efforts since the early 1990s to develop comprehensive HIV/AIDS care services. To evaluate existing services and needs in advance of the national HAART scale-up, in 2002 we surveyed 31 hospitals and 389 community health centers in three northern Thai provinces, and interviewed 1,015 HIV-infected patients attending outpatient clinics. All hospitals offered voluntary HIV counseling and testing, 84% provided primary prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, 58% for tuberculosis, 39% for cryptococcal meningitis, and 87% had some experience providing antiretroviral therapy. Community health centers provided more limited service coverage. Of patients interviewed, 63% had been diagnosed with symptomatic HIV disease, and of these, 32% reported ever receiving antiretroviral therapy; 51% of all patients had received a CD4 T-lymphocyte count. Thailand's current national HAART scale-up is being performed in a setting of well-developed hospital-based services introduced over the course of the epidemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-89
Number of pages7
JournalSoutheast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
Volume37
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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