HIV testing behaviors in a population of inner-city women at high risk for HIV infection

Liza Solomon, Jan Moore, Alice Gleghorn, Jacquie Astemborski, David Vlahov

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The relationship between HIV testing history, HIV serostatus, and risk behaviors was examined to investigate factors associated with obtaining an HIV test, returning for results, or receiving multiple tests. Seven hundred and five volunteers for an HIV study were questioned about prior HIV testing, drug and sexual practices, and sociodemographic characteristics. Women who reported a prior HIV test were compared with those without a previous test; women who returned for test results were compared with those not returning; and women who reported multiple tests were compared with those having only one test. Seventy-five percent of the women reported a prior test; 12% had not returned for test results; 46% reported multiple tests. Women reporting higher levels of HIV risk behaviors were more likely to have been tested and to return for results. Injection drug use and having four or more sex partners were significantly associated with repeated HIV testing. Over one third of the women with substantial HIV risk practices had not been HIV tested or failed to obtain test results. Women who obtained multiple HIV tests were more likely to report high-risk practices in spite of having received risk counseling with repeated testing.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)267-272
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology
    Volume13
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

    Keywords

    • HIV counseling and testing
    • HIV serodiagnosis
    • Prevention
    • Women

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Immunology and Allergy
    • Immunology
    • Virology

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