HIV risk behavior and medical status of underprivileged youths in Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Jorge A. Pinto, Andrea J Ruff, Jose V. Paiva, Carlos M. Antunes, Irene K. Adams, Neal A Halsey, Dirceu B. Greco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Methods: From June 1989 to April 1991, 394 adolescents aged 10-18 years randomly selected upon admission at a state shelter in Belo Horizonte, Brazil underwent health history interview, physical examination, serology for HIV, hepatitis B, and syphilis, and stool examination. Participants were classified as street-based youths (n = 195) or home-based youths (n = 199). The age distribution was similar in both groups, although males were overrepresented among street-based youths (79.5% versus 62.3%). Results: Compared with home-based youths, street-based youths reported earlier onset (p = 0.009) and higher rates of sexual activity (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-3.3), sexual abuse (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.2-10.1), and sexually transmitted diseases (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.6). Overall condom use was low in both groups. Street-based youths were 7.8 times more likely to use drugs than home-based youths (95%CI, 4.9-12.7). Inhalants and marijuana were the more commonly used drugs. Intravenous drug use was low. Conclusions: Although chronic malnutrition and multiple parasitosis were common findings in both groups, street-based youths were more likely to present disorders related to trauma and poor hygienic conditions. Antibodies to HIV were detected in four (2%) street-based youths and in none of the home-based youths. This study confirms that street youths are at higher risk for HIV infection than their home-based peers and indicates a need for HIV prevention programs targeting this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-185
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Homeless Youth
Risk-Taking
Brazil
HIV
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Pharmaceutical Preparations
HIV Antibodies
Population Control
Sex Offenses
Age Distribution
Condoms
Serology
Syphilis
Cannabis
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Hepatitis B
Malnutrition
Sexual Behavior
Physical Examination

Keywords

  • Homeless Adolescents
  • institutionalized HIV seroprevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

HIV risk behavior and medical status of underprivileged youths in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. / Pinto, Jorge A.; Ruff, Andrea J; Paiva, Jose V.; Antunes, Carlos M.; Adams, Irene K.; Halsey, Neal A; Greco, Dirceu B.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 15, No. 2, 1994, p. 179-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pinto, Jorge A. ; Ruff, Andrea J ; Paiva, Jose V. ; Antunes, Carlos M. ; Adams, Irene K. ; Halsey, Neal A ; Greco, Dirceu B. / HIV risk behavior and medical status of underprivileged youths in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 1994 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 179-185.
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title = "HIV risk behavior and medical status of underprivileged youths in Belo Horizonte, Brazil",
abstract = "Methods: From June 1989 to April 1991, 394 adolescents aged 10-18 years randomly selected upon admission at a state shelter in Belo Horizonte, Brazil underwent health history interview, physical examination, serology for HIV, hepatitis B, and syphilis, and stool examination. Participants were classified as street-based youths (n = 195) or home-based youths (n = 199). The age distribution was similar in both groups, although males were overrepresented among street-based youths (79.5{\%} versus 62.3{\%}). Results: Compared with home-based youths, street-based youths reported earlier onset (p = 0.009) and higher rates of sexual activity (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.4-3.3), sexual abuse (OR, 3.7; 95{\%} CI, 1.2-10.1), and sexually transmitted diseases (OR, 2.9; 95{\%} CI, 1.3-6.6). Overall condom use was low in both groups. Street-based youths were 7.8 times more likely to use drugs than home-based youths (95{\%}CI, 4.9-12.7). Inhalants and marijuana were the more commonly used drugs. Intravenous drug use was low. Conclusions: Although chronic malnutrition and multiple parasitosis were common findings in both groups, street-based youths were more likely to present disorders related to trauma and poor hygienic conditions. Antibodies to HIV were detected in four (2{\%}) street-based youths and in none of the home-based youths. This study confirms that street youths are at higher risk for HIV infection than their home-based peers and indicates a need for HIV prevention programs targeting this population.",
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AU - Ruff, Andrea J

AU - Paiva, Jose V.

AU - Antunes, Carlos M.

AU - Adams, Irene K.

AU - Halsey, Neal A

AU - Greco, Dirceu B.

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N2 - Methods: From June 1989 to April 1991, 394 adolescents aged 10-18 years randomly selected upon admission at a state shelter in Belo Horizonte, Brazil underwent health history interview, physical examination, serology for HIV, hepatitis B, and syphilis, and stool examination. Participants were classified as street-based youths (n = 195) or home-based youths (n = 199). The age distribution was similar in both groups, although males were overrepresented among street-based youths (79.5% versus 62.3%). Results: Compared with home-based youths, street-based youths reported earlier onset (p = 0.009) and higher rates of sexual activity (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-3.3), sexual abuse (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.2-10.1), and sexually transmitted diseases (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.6). Overall condom use was low in both groups. Street-based youths were 7.8 times more likely to use drugs than home-based youths (95%CI, 4.9-12.7). Inhalants and marijuana were the more commonly used drugs. Intravenous drug use was low. Conclusions: Although chronic malnutrition and multiple parasitosis were common findings in both groups, street-based youths were more likely to present disorders related to trauma and poor hygienic conditions. Antibodies to HIV were detected in four (2%) street-based youths and in none of the home-based youths. This study confirms that street youths are at higher risk for HIV infection than their home-based peers and indicates a need for HIV prevention programs targeting this population.

AB - Methods: From June 1989 to April 1991, 394 adolescents aged 10-18 years randomly selected upon admission at a state shelter in Belo Horizonte, Brazil underwent health history interview, physical examination, serology for HIV, hepatitis B, and syphilis, and stool examination. Participants were classified as street-based youths (n = 195) or home-based youths (n = 199). The age distribution was similar in both groups, although males were overrepresented among street-based youths (79.5% versus 62.3%). Results: Compared with home-based youths, street-based youths reported earlier onset (p = 0.009) and higher rates of sexual activity (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-3.3), sexual abuse (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.2-10.1), and sexually transmitted diseases (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.6). Overall condom use was low in both groups. Street-based youths were 7.8 times more likely to use drugs than home-based youths (95%CI, 4.9-12.7). Inhalants and marijuana were the more commonly used drugs. Intravenous drug use was low. Conclusions: Although chronic malnutrition and multiple parasitosis were common findings in both groups, street-based youths were more likely to present disorders related to trauma and poor hygienic conditions. Antibodies to HIV were detected in four (2%) street-based youths and in none of the home-based youths. This study confirms that street youths are at higher risk for HIV infection than their home-based peers and indicates a need for HIV prevention programs targeting this population.

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