HIV Partner Notification Values and Preferences Among Sex Workers, Fishermen, and Mainland Community Members in Rakai, Uganda: A Qualitative Study

Caitlin Quinn, Neema Nakyanjo, William Ddaaki, Virginia M. Burke, Naadiya Hutchinson, Joseph Kagaayi, Maria J. Wawer, Fred Nalugoda, Caitlin E. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

HIV partner notification involves contacting sexual partners of people who test HIV positive and referring them to HIV testing, treatment, and prevention services. To understand values and preferences of key and general populations in Rakai, Uganda, we conducted 6 focus group discussions and 63 in-depth interviews in high prevalence fishing communities and low prevalence mainland communities. Participants included fishermen and sex workers in fishing communities, male and female mainland community members, and healthcare providers. Questions explored three approaches: passive referral, provider referral, and contract referral. Qualitative data were coded and analyzed using a team-based matrix approach. Participants agreed that passive referral was most suitable for primary partners. Provider referral was acceptable in fishing communities for notifying multiple, casual partners. Healthcare providers voiced concerns about limited time, resources, and training for provider-assisted approaches. Options for partner notification may help people overcome barriers to HIV serostatus disclosure and help reach key populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3407-3416
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • General populations
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Key populations
  • Partner notification
  • Sex workers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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