HIV infection, immune suppression, and uncontrolled viremia are associated with increased multimorbidity among aging injection drug users

Megan L. Salter, Bryan Lau, Vivian F. Go, Shruti H. Mehta, Gregory D. Kirk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Despite an increasing burden of age-associated non-AIDS outcomes, few studies have investigated the prevalence or correlates of multimorbidity among aging human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and epidemiologically comparable at-risk populations. Methods. Among 1262 AIDS Linked to the IntraVenous Experience (ALIVE) study participants followed in a community-based observational cohort, we defined the prevalence of 7 non-AIDS-defining chronic conditions (diabetes, obstructive lung disease, liver disease, anemia, obesity, kidney dysfunction, and hypertension) using clinical and laboratory criteria. Ordinal logistic regression was used to model the odds of increased multimorbidity associated with demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors. Self-reported prevalence was compared with clinically defined prevalence. Results. Participants were a median of 48.9 years of age; 65.1% were male, 87.5% were African-American, and 28.7% were HIV infected. In multivariable analysis, HIV infection (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.99) was positively associated with increased multimorbidity. Among HIV-infected participants, multimorbidity was increased with lower nadir CD4 T-cell count (OR, 1.14 per 100-cell decrease; 95% CI, 1.00-1.29) and higher current HIV RNA (OR, 1.32 per log10 increase; 95% CI, 1.08-1.60). Older age, being female, not using cigarettes or drugs, and having depressive symptoms were also associated with increased multimorbidity. A substantial proportion of multimorbid conditions in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants were unrecognized and untreated. Conclusions. HIV-infected participants experienced increased numbers of multimorbid conditions; risk increased with advanced immunosuppression and higher viremia. These results underscore the heavy burden of multimorbidity associated with HIV and highlight the need for incorporating routine assessment and integrated management of chronic diseases as part of comprehensive healthcare for aging, HIV-infected persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1256-1264
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume53
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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