HIV diagnosis and fertility intentions among couple VCT clients in Ethiopia

Yung Ting Bonnenfant, Michelle J. Hindin, Duff Gillespie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In Ethiopia, most HIV-affected couples are in serodiscordant relationships and must weigh any childbearing desires against the risk of transmitting the virus to a partner or child. This analysis investigates the relationship between HIV diagnosis and fertility intentions among couple voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) clients in Ethiopia and whether this relationship differs between men and women. Data come from the Ethiopia Voluntary Counseling and Testing Integrated with Contraceptive Services (VICS) study, which collected information from men and women attending VCT at eight public sector health facilities in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. VCT clients were asked about their fertility intentions before (pre-test) and after (post-test) receiving their HIV test results. Sex-stratified logistic regression was used to find characteristics, such as the couple's HIV status, associated with ceasing to desire children between pre-test and post-test versus desiring children at both time points. Women belonging to serodiscordant couples were much more likely to cease desiring children than women in HIV-concordant couples, regardless of whether the woman (aOR=11.08, p<0.001) or her partner (aOR=9.97, p=0.001) was HIV+. Only HIV+ men in serodiscordant relationships were more likely to stop desiring children than men in HIV-concordant couples (aOR=12.10, p<0.001). Serodiscordant couples would benefit from family planning services or referrals during VCT to help meet their reproductive needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1407-1415
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

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Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • VCT
  • couple
  • fertility intentions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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