HIV-1 Tat induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-mediated monocyte transmigration across a model of the human blood-brain barrier and up- regulates CCR5 expression on human monocytes

Jonathan M. Weiss, Avindra Nath, Eugene O. Major, Joan W. Berman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIDS dementia is characterized by neuronal loss in association with synaptic damage. A central predictor for clinical onset of these symptoms is the infiltration of monocytes and macrophages into CNS parenchyma. Chronic HIV-1 infection of monocytes also allows these cells to serve as reservoirs for persistent viral infection. Using a coculture of endothelial cells and astrocytes that models several aspects of the human blood-brain barrier, we examined the mechanism whereby the HIV-derived factor Tat may facilitate monocyte transmigration. We demonstrate that treatment of cocultures on the astrocyte side with HIV-1 Tat induced significant monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 protein. Astrocytes, but not endothelial cells, were the source of this MCP-1 expression. Supernatants from Tat-treated cocultures induced significant monocyte transmigration, which was detected by 2.5 h after the addition of PBMC. Pretreatment of the supernatants from Tat- stimulated cocultures with an Ab to MCP-1 completely blocked monocyte transmigration. Flow cytometric analysis of Tat-stimulated PBMC demonstrated that Tat upregulated expression of the chemokine receptor, CCR5, on monocytes in a time-dependent manner. Taken together, our data indicate that HIV-1 Tat may facilitate the recruitment of monocytes into the CNS by inducing MCP-1 expression in astrocytes. These recruited monocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated AIDS encephalitis and dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2953-2959
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume163
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Chemokine CCL2
Blood-Brain Barrier
HIV-1
Monocytes
Up-Regulation
Coculture Techniques
Astrocytes
Dementia
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Endothelial Cells
Chemokine Receptors
Virus Diseases
Encephalitis
HIV Infections
Macrophages
HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

HIV-1 Tat induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-mediated monocyte transmigration across a model of the human blood-brain barrier and up- regulates CCR5 expression on human monocytes. / Weiss, Jonathan M.; Nath, Avindra; Major, Eugene O.; Berman, Joan W.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 163, No. 5, 01.09.1999, p. 2953-2959.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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