Historical perspectives on the control of breathing

Robert S Fitzgerald, Neil S. Cherniack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Among the several topics included in respiratory studies investigators have focused on the control of breathing for a relatively few number of years, perhaps only the last 75 to 80. For a very long time, the phenomenon of respiration presented a great mystery. The Chinese had suggestions for proper breathing, and later the Egyptians sought to understand its purpose. But in the western world, the early Greeks made the more significant observations. Centuries passed before the anatomical structures pertinent to respiration were properly visualized and located. There followed efforts to understand if lung movement was necessary for life and what happened in the lung. The rise of chemistry in the 18th century eventually clarified the roles of the gases significant in respiratory behavior. More time was needed to understand what gases provoked increases in breathing and where those gases worked. At this point, control of breathing became a significant focus of respiratory investigators. Studies included identifying the structures and functions of central and peripheral chemoreceptors, and airway receptors, sources of respiratory rhythm and pattern generation, the impact of the organism's status on its breathing including environment and disease/trauma. At this same time, mid- to late-20th century, efforts to mathematicize the variables in the control of breathing appeared. So though wonderment about the mysterious phenomenon of respiration began over two millennia ago, serious physiological investigation into its control is by comparison very young.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-932
Number of pages18
JournalComprehensive Physiology
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Respiration
Gases
Research Personnel
Lung
Western World
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Historical perspectives on the control of breathing. / Fitzgerald, Robert S; Cherniack, Neil S.

In: Comprehensive Physiology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 915-932.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fitzgerald, Robert S ; Cherniack, Neil S. / Historical perspectives on the control of breathing. In: Comprehensive Physiology. 2012 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 915-932.
@article{51a96e5041954bde97acbb428f19366f,
title = "Historical perspectives on the control of breathing",
abstract = "Among the several topics included in respiratory studies investigators have focused on the control of breathing for a relatively few number of years, perhaps only the last 75 to 80. For a very long time, the phenomenon of respiration presented a great mystery. The Chinese had suggestions for proper breathing, and later the Egyptians sought to understand its purpose. But in the western world, the early Greeks made the more significant observations. Centuries passed before the anatomical structures pertinent to respiration were properly visualized and located. There followed efforts to understand if lung movement was necessary for life and what happened in the lung. The rise of chemistry in the 18th century eventually clarified the roles of the gases significant in respiratory behavior. More time was needed to understand what gases provoked increases in breathing and where those gases worked. At this point, control of breathing became a significant focus of respiratory investigators. Studies included identifying the structures and functions of central and peripheral chemoreceptors, and airway receptors, sources of respiratory rhythm and pattern generation, the impact of the organism's status on its breathing including environment and disease/trauma. At this same time, mid- to late-20th century, efforts to mathematicize the variables in the control of breathing appeared. So though wonderment about the mysterious phenomenon of respiration began over two millennia ago, serious physiological investigation into its control is by comparison very young.",
author = "Fitzgerald, {Robert S} and Cherniack, {Neil S.}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1002/cphy.c100007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "915--932",
journal = "Comprehensive Physiology",
issn = "2040-4603",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Historical perspectives on the control of breathing

AU - Fitzgerald, Robert S

AU - Cherniack, Neil S.

PY - 2012/4

Y1 - 2012/4

N2 - Among the several topics included in respiratory studies investigators have focused on the control of breathing for a relatively few number of years, perhaps only the last 75 to 80. For a very long time, the phenomenon of respiration presented a great mystery. The Chinese had suggestions for proper breathing, and later the Egyptians sought to understand its purpose. But in the western world, the early Greeks made the more significant observations. Centuries passed before the anatomical structures pertinent to respiration were properly visualized and located. There followed efforts to understand if lung movement was necessary for life and what happened in the lung. The rise of chemistry in the 18th century eventually clarified the roles of the gases significant in respiratory behavior. More time was needed to understand what gases provoked increases in breathing and where those gases worked. At this point, control of breathing became a significant focus of respiratory investigators. Studies included identifying the structures and functions of central and peripheral chemoreceptors, and airway receptors, sources of respiratory rhythm and pattern generation, the impact of the organism's status on its breathing including environment and disease/trauma. At this same time, mid- to late-20th century, efforts to mathematicize the variables in the control of breathing appeared. So though wonderment about the mysterious phenomenon of respiration began over two millennia ago, serious physiological investigation into its control is by comparison very young.

AB - Among the several topics included in respiratory studies investigators have focused on the control of breathing for a relatively few number of years, perhaps only the last 75 to 80. For a very long time, the phenomenon of respiration presented a great mystery. The Chinese had suggestions for proper breathing, and later the Egyptians sought to understand its purpose. But in the western world, the early Greeks made the more significant observations. Centuries passed before the anatomical structures pertinent to respiration were properly visualized and located. There followed efforts to understand if lung movement was necessary for life and what happened in the lung. The rise of chemistry in the 18th century eventually clarified the roles of the gases significant in respiratory behavior. More time was needed to understand what gases provoked increases in breathing and where those gases worked. At this point, control of breathing became a significant focus of respiratory investigators. Studies included identifying the structures and functions of central and peripheral chemoreceptors, and airway receptors, sources of respiratory rhythm and pattern generation, the impact of the organism's status on its breathing including environment and disease/trauma. At this same time, mid- to late-20th century, efforts to mathematicize the variables in the control of breathing appeared. So though wonderment about the mysterious phenomenon of respiration began over two millennia ago, serious physiological investigation into its control is by comparison very young.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862174220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862174220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cphy.c100007

DO - 10.1002/cphy.c100007

M3 - Article

C2 - 23798292

AN - SCOPUS:84862174220

VL - 2

SP - 915

EP - 932

JO - Comprehensive Physiology

JF - Comprehensive Physiology

SN - 2040-4603

IS - 2

ER -