Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons Comprise Two Distinct Cell Types that Are Countermodulated by Metabotropic Receptors

Austin R. Graves, Shannon J. Moore, Erik B. Bloss, Brett D. Mensh, William L. Kath, Nelson Spruston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Relating the function of neuronal cell types to information processing and behavior is a central goal of neuroscience. In the hippocampus, pyramidal cells in CA1 and the subiculum process sensory and motor cues to form a cognitive map encoding spatial, contextual, and emotional information, which they transmit throughout the brain. Do these cells constitute a single class or are there multiple cell types with specialized functions? Using unbiased cluster analysis, we show that there are two morphologically and electrophysiologically distinct principal cell types that carry hippocampal output. We show further that these two cell types are inversely modulated by the synergistic action of glutamate and acetylcholine acting on metabotropic receptors that are central to hippocampal function. Combined with prior connectivity studies, our results support a model of hippocampal processing in which the two pyramidal cell types are predominantly segregated into two parallel pathways that process distinct modalities of information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)776-789
Number of pages14
JournalNeuron
Volume76
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 21 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons Comprise Two Distinct Cell Types that Are Countermodulated by Metabotropic Receptors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this