Highly active antiretroviral therapy associated with improved anemia among HIV-infected women

HER STUDY GROUP

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Anemia is common during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and is associated with increased mortality. We conducted a study to examine the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on anemia in a multicenter cohort of HIV-positive women, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemiology Research (HER) Study. Among women receiving HAART (n = 188), non-HAART monotherapy or combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) (n = 111), or who had no reported treatment (n = 62), the prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin, <120 g/L) at baseline was 38.3, 36.9, and 43.6%, respectively (p = 0.58) and at 1-year follow-up was 26.1%, 36.9%, 45.2%, respectively (p = 0.01); mean hemoglobin at baseline was 125 ± 16, 122 ± 16, and 122 ± 18 g/L, respectively (p = 0.29) and at 1-year follow-up was 128 ± 14, 123 ± 16, and 119 ± 20 g/L, respectively (p < 0.0001). Adjusted linear regression models showed that HAART was associated with an increase of hemoglobin of 0.20 g/L per month (p = 0.007). After 1 year of treatment, HAART was associated with a 32% reduction in anemia among HIV-infected women (p = 0.01), whereas there was no significant change in the prevalence of anemia among those on non-HAART ART or those who had no reported treatment. HAART is associated with a large reduction in anemia among HIV-infected women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-480
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs
Volume15
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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