High, usual and impaired functioning in community-dwelling older men and women: Findings from the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on successful aging

Lisa F. Berkman, Teresa E. Seeman, Marilyn Albert, Dan Blazer, Robert Kahn, Richard Mohs, Caleb Finch, Edward Schneider, Carl Cotman, Gerald McClearn, John Nesselroade, David Featherman, Norman Garmezy, Guy McKhann, Gilbert Brim, Denis Prager, John Rowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study is to determine the range of complex physical and cognitive abilities of older men and women functioning at high, medium and impaired ranges and to determine the psychosocial and physiological conditions that discriminate those in the high functioning group from those functioning at middle or impaired ranges. The subjects for this study were drawn from men and women aged 70-79 from 3 Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (EPESE) programs in East Boston MA, New Haven CT, and Durham County NC screened on the basis of criteria of physical and cognitive function. In 1988, 4030 men and women were screened as part of their annual EPESE interview. 1192 men and women met criteria for "high functioning". Age and sex-matched subjects were selected to represent the medium (n = 80) and low (n = 82) functioning groups. Physical and cognitive functioning was assessed from performance-based examinations and self-reported abilities. Physical function measures focused on balance, gait, and upper body strength. Cognitive exams assessed memory, language, abstraction, and praxis. Significant differences for every performance-based examination of physical and cognitive function were observed across functioning groups. Low functioning subjects were almost 3 times as likely to have an income of ≤$5000 compared to the high functioning group. They were less likely to have completed high school. High functioning subjects smoked cigarettes less and exercised more than others. They had higher levels of DHEA-S and peak expiratory flow rate. High functioning elders were more likely to engage in volunteer activities and score higher on scales of self-efficacy, mastery and report fewer psychiatric symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1129-1140
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume46
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Independent Living
Aptitude
Research
Cognition
Epidemiologic Studies
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Dehydroepiandrosterone
Self Efficacy
Gait
Tobacco Products
Self Report
Population
Physical Examination
Psychiatry
Volunteers
Language
Interviews

Keywords

  • Cognitive functioning
  • Physical functioning
  • Successful aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

High, usual and impaired functioning in community-dwelling older men and women : Findings from the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on successful aging. / Berkman, Lisa F.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Albert, Marilyn; Blazer, Dan; Kahn, Robert; Mohs, Richard; Finch, Caleb; Schneider, Edward; Cotman, Carl; McClearn, Gerald; Nesselroade, John; Featherman, David; Garmezy, Norman; McKhann, Guy; Brim, Gilbert; Prager, Denis; Rowe, John.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 46, No. 10, 1993, p. 1129-1140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berkman, LF, Seeman, TE, Albert, M, Blazer, D, Kahn, R, Mohs, R, Finch, C, Schneider, E, Cotman, C, McClearn, G, Nesselroade, J, Featherman, D, Garmezy, N, McKhann, G, Brim, G, Prager, D & Rowe, J 1993, 'High, usual and impaired functioning in community-dwelling older men and women: Findings from the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on successful aging', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 46, no. 10, pp. 1129-1140. https://doi.org/10.1016/0895-4356(93)90112-E
Berkman, Lisa F. ; Seeman, Teresa E. ; Albert, Marilyn ; Blazer, Dan ; Kahn, Robert ; Mohs, Richard ; Finch, Caleb ; Schneider, Edward ; Cotman, Carl ; McClearn, Gerald ; Nesselroade, John ; Featherman, David ; Garmezy, Norman ; McKhann, Guy ; Brim, Gilbert ; Prager, Denis ; Rowe, John. / High, usual and impaired functioning in community-dwelling older men and women : Findings from the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on successful aging. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 1993 ; Vol. 46, No. 10. pp. 1129-1140.
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