High spatial and temporal resolution cardiac cine MRI from retrospective reconstruction of data acquired in real time using motion correction and resorting

Peter Kellman, Christophe Chefd'hotel, Christine H. Lorenz, Christine Mancini, Andrew E. Arai, Elliot R. McVeigh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cine MRI is used for assessing cardiac function and flow and is typically based on a breath-held, segmented data acquisition. Breath holding is particularly difficult for patients with congestive heart failure or in pediatric cases. Real-time imaging may be used without breath holding or ECG triggering. However, despite the use of rapid imaging sequences and accelerated parallel imaging, real-time imaging typically has compromised spatial and temporal resolution compared with gated, segmented breath-held studies. A new method is proposed that produces a cardiac cine across the full cycle, with both high spatial and temporal resolution from a retrospective reconstruction of data acquired over multiple heartbeats during free breathing. The proposed method was compared with conventional cine images in 10 subjects. The resultant image quality for the proposed method (4.2 ± 0.4) without breath holding or gating was comparable to the conventional cine (4.4 ± 0.5) on a five-point scale (P = n.s.). Motion-corrected averaging of realtime acquired cardiac images provides a means of attaining high-quality cine images with many of the benefits of real-time imaging, such as free-breathing acquisition and tolerance to arrhythmias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1557-1564
Number of pages8
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

Keywords

  • Heart
  • Motion correction
  • MRI
  • Myocardial function
  • Navigator
  • Nonrigid
  • Parallel MRI
  • Real-time
  • SENSE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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