High school students' attitudes about firearms policies

Katherine A. Vittes, Susan B. Sorenson, Dennis Gilbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To examine high school students' attitudes about firearm policies and to compare their attitudes with those of adults. Methods: The Hamilton Youth and Guns Poll is the first national survey of high school students about their attitudes concerning firearm policies. Questions were asked of 1005 sophomores, juniors, and seniors about their actual (i.e., direct) exposure (e.g., presence of a gun in the home) and about their social (i.e., indirect) exposure (e.g., whether the student could get a gun) to firearms and related violence. Population weights were applied, and multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between demographic and exposure variables and opinions about firearm policies. Results: Most high school students supported more restrictive firearm policies. Opinions varied little by demographic variables with the exception of gender. Females were significantly more supportive of most firearm policies. Actual exposure was a more consistent predictor than social exposure. Students living in a home with a gun, particularly a handgun, were less likely to support most restrictive gun policies. Conclusions: Most high school students in the United States favor stringent policies governing firearms. Adolescents' attitudes about firearm policies parallel those of adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-478
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Firearms
Students
Demography
Violence
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Attitudes
  • Firearms
  • Gender differences
  • Guns

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

High school students' attitudes about firearms policies. / Vittes, Katherine A.; Sorenson, Susan B.; Gilbert, Dennis.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 33, No. 6, 12.2003, p. 471-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vittes, Katherine A. ; Sorenson, Susan B. ; Gilbert, Dennis. / High school students' attitudes about firearms policies. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2003 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 471-478.
@article{e8a99b6ca1f7455c84409052b529fffe,
title = "High school students' attitudes about firearms policies",
abstract = "Purpose: To examine high school students' attitudes about firearm policies and to compare their attitudes with those of adults. Methods: The Hamilton Youth and Guns Poll is the first national survey of high school students about their attitudes concerning firearm policies. Questions were asked of 1005 sophomores, juniors, and seniors about their actual (i.e., direct) exposure (e.g., presence of a gun in the home) and about their social (i.e., indirect) exposure (e.g., whether the student could get a gun) to firearms and related violence. Population weights were applied, and multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between demographic and exposure variables and opinions about firearm policies. Results: Most high school students supported more restrictive firearm policies. Opinions varied little by demographic variables with the exception of gender. Females were significantly more supportive of most firearm policies. Actual exposure was a more consistent predictor than social exposure. Students living in a home with a gun, particularly a handgun, were less likely to support most restrictive gun policies. Conclusions: Most high school students in the United States favor stringent policies governing firearms. Adolescents' attitudes about firearm policies parallel those of adults.",
keywords = "Adolescents, Attitudes, Firearms, Gender differences, Guns",
author = "Vittes, {Katherine A.} and Sorenson, {Susan B.} and Dennis Gilbert",
year = "2003",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/S1054-139X(03)00142-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "471--478",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High school students' attitudes about firearms policies

AU - Vittes, Katherine A.

AU - Sorenson, Susan B.

AU - Gilbert, Dennis

PY - 2003/12

Y1 - 2003/12

N2 - Purpose: To examine high school students' attitudes about firearm policies and to compare their attitudes with those of adults. Methods: The Hamilton Youth and Guns Poll is the first national survey of high school students about their attitudes concerning firearm policies. Questions were asked of 1005 sophomores, juniors, and seniors about their actual (i.e., direct) exposure (e.g., presence of a gun in the home) and about their social (i.e., indirect) exposure (e.g., whether the student could get a gun) to firearms and related violence. Population weights were applied, and multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between demographic and exposure variables and opinions about firearm policies. Results: Most high school students supported more restrictive firearm policies. Opinions varied little by demographic variables with the exception of gender. Females were significantly more supportive of most firearm policies. Actual exposure was a more consistent predictor than social exposure. Students living in a home with a gun, particularly a handgun, were less likely to support most restrictive gun policies. Conclusions: Most high school students in the United States favor stringent policies governing firearms. Adolescents' attitudes about firearm policies parallel those of adults.

AB - Purpose: To examine high school students' attitudes about firearm policies and to compare their attitudes with those of adults. Methods: The Hamilton Youth and Guns Poll is the first national survey of high school students about their attitudes concerning firearm policies. Questions were asked of 1005 sophomores, juniors, and seniors about their actual (i.e., direct) exposure (e.g., presence of a gun in the home) and about their social (i.e., indirect) exposure (e.g., whether the student could get a gun) to firearms and related violence. Population weights were applied, and multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between demographic and exposure variables and opinions about firearm policies. Results: Most high school students supported more restrictive firearm policies. Opinions varied little by demographic variables with the exception of gender. Females were significantly more supportive of most firearm policies. Actual exposure was a more consistent predictor than social exposure. Students living in a home with a gun, particularly a handgun, were less likely to support most restrictive gun policies. Conclusions: Most high school students in the United States favor stringent policies governing firearms. Adolescents' attitudes about firearm policies parallel those of adults.

KW - Adolescents

KW - Attitudes

KW - Firearms

KW - Gender differences

KW - Guns

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0344011057&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0344011057&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1054-139X(03)00142-3

DO - 10.1016/S1054-139X(03)00142-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 14642709

AN - SCOPUS:0344011057

VL - 33

SP - 471

EP - 478

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 6

ER -