High-risk human papillomavirus viral load and persistence among heterosexual HIV-negative and HIV-positive men

Mary K. Grabowski, Ronald H. Gray, David Serwadda, Godfrey Kigozi, Patti E. Gravitt, Fred Nalugoda, Steven J. Reynolds, Maria J. Wawer, Stephen Watya, Thomas C. Quinn, Aaron A.R. Tobian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) viral load is associated with HR-HPV transmission and HR-HPV persistence in women. It is unknown whether HR-HPV viral load is associated with persistence in HIV-negative or HIV-positive men. Methods: HR-HPV viral load and persistence were evaluated among 703 HIV-negative and 233 HIV-positive heterosexual men who participated in a male circumcision trial in Rakai, Uganda. Penile swabs were tested at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 months for HR-HPV using the Roche HPV Linear Array, which provides a semiquantitative measure of HPV shedding by hybridisation band intensity (graded: 1-4). Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to estimate the association between HR-HPV viral load and persistent detection of HR-HPV. Results: HR-HPV genotypes with high viral load (grade:3-4) at baseline were more likely to persist than HR-HPV genotypes with low viral load (grade: 1-2) among HIV-negative men (month 6: adjPRR=1.83, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.52; month 12: adjPRR=2.01, 95% CI 1.42 to 3.11), and HIV-positive men (month 6: adjPRR=1.33, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.67; month 12: adjPRR=1.73, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.54). Long-term persistence of HR-HPV was more frequent among HIV-positive men compared with HIV-negative men (month 24: adjPRR=2.27, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.51). Persistence of newly detected HR-HPV at the 6-month and 12-month visits with high viral load were also more likely to persist to 24 months than HR-HPV with low viral load among HIV-negative men (adjPRR=1.67, 95% CI 0.88 to 3.16). Conclusions: HR-HPV genotypes with high viral load are more likely to persist among HIV-negative and HIV-positive men, though persistence was more common among HIV-positive men overall. The results may explain the association between high HR-HPV viral load and HR-HPV transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-343
Number of pages7
JournalSexually transmitted infections
Volume90
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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