High rates of midazolam self-administration in squirrel monkeys

P. Munzar, Sevil Yasar, G. H. Redhi, Z. Justinova, S. R. Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although benzodiazepines are frequently abused by humans, they usually maintain lower rates of self-administration behavior in laboratory animals than other drugs of abuse such as psychomotor stimulants or barbiturates. In the present study, intravenous (i.v.) self-administration of the short-acting benzodiazepine midazolam was evaluated in squirrel monkeys. Monkeys (n = 3) initially self-administered the short-acting barbiturate methohexital (100 μg/kg/injection) during daily 1-hour sessions under a fixed-ratio 10, 60s time-out, schedule of i.v. drug injection. This dose of methohexital maintained high rates of responding averaging 0.9 responses per second. Midazolam was then substituted for methohexital, and midazolam dose was subsequently varied from 0.3 to 3 μg/kg/injection. Each dose of midazolam was tested for five consecutive sessions and each unit dose condition was separated by five sessions of vehicle extinction. The midazolam dose-response function was an inverted U-shaped curve, with maximal rates of self-administration responding averaging 1.01 responses/second at a dose of μg/kg/injection (an average of 48 injections per 1-hour session). The rates and fixed-ratio patterns of responding maintained by self-administration of midazolam in the present study were comparable to the rates and patterns of responding maintained in squirrel monkeys by self-administration of other drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamine, nicotine and tetrahydrocannabinol, under similar experimental conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-265
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioural Pharmacology
Volume12
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Saimiri
Self Administration
Midazolam
Methohexital
Injections
Street Drugs
Benzodiazepines
Barbiturates
Dronabinol
Laboratory Animals
Amphetamine
Nicotine
Cocaine
Intravenous Injections
Intravenous Administration
Haplorhini
Appointments and Schedules
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Methohexital
  • Midazolam
  • Self-administration
  • Squirrel monkey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Munzar, P., Yasar, S., Redhi, G. H., Justinova, Z., & Goldberg, S. R. (2001). High rates of midazolam self-administration in squirrel monkeys. Behavioural Pharmacology, 12(4), 257-265.

High rates of midazolam self-administration in squirrel monkeys. / Munzar, P.; Yasar, Sevil; Redhi, G. H.; Justinova, Z.; Goldberg, S. R.

In: Behavioural Pharmacology, Vol. 12, No. 4, 2001, p. 257-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Munzar, P, Yasar, S, Redhi, GH, Justinova, Z & Goldberg, SR 2001, 'High rates of midazolam self-administration in squirrel monkeys', Behavioural Pharmacology, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 257-265.
Munzar P, Yasar S, Redhi GH, Justinova Z, Goldberg SR. High rates of midazolam self-administration in squirrel monkeys. Behavioural Pharmacology. 2001;12(4):257-265.
Munzar, P. ; Yasar, Sevil ; Redhi, G. H. ; Justinova, Z. ; Goldberg, S. R. / High rates of midazolam self-administration in squirrel monkeys. In: Behavioural Pharmacology. 2001 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 257-265.
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