High Prevalence of Hepatitis C Infection among Adult Patients at Four Urban Emergency Departments-Birmingham, Oakland, Baltimore, and Boston, 2015-2017

James W. Galbraith, Erik S. Anderson, Yu Hsiang Hsieh, Ricardo A. Franco, John P. Donnelly, Joel B. Rodgers, Elissa M. Schechter-Perkins, William W. Thompson, Noele P. Nelson, Richard E. Rothman, Douglas A.E. White

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

What is already known about this topic? Targeted testing for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in emergency departments (EDs) has been demonstrated to be a high-yield and effective intervention for identifying previously unrecognized infections, especially among persons born during 1945–1965. What is added by this report? Opt-out, universal HCV screening in EDs identified that nearly half (47.5%) of infections were among persons born after 1965. What are the implications for public health practice? Opt-out, universal screening in EDs can identify a larger number of previously unrecognized HCV infections, especially among persons born after 1965. ED-based opt-out, universal hepatitis C screening can be vital in combating and surveilling the interrelated epidemics of opioid overdose and bloodborne viral infections through harm-reduction interventions and navigation to HCV treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-574
Number of pages6
JournalMorbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Volume69
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Health Information Management

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