High-fat diet offsets the long-lasting effects of running-wheel access on food intake and body weight in OLETF rats

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that running-wheel access normalizes the food intake and body weight of Otsuka Long-Evens Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Following 6 wk of running-wheel access beginning at 8 wk of age, the body weight of OLETF rats remains reduced, demonstrating a lasting effect on their phenotype. In contrast, access to a high-fat diet exacerbates the hyperphagia and obesity of OLETF rats. To determine whether diet modulates the long-term effects of exercise, we examined the effects of high-fat diet on food intake and body weight in OLETF rats that had prior access to running wheels for 4 wk. We found that 4 wk of running exercise significantly decreased food intake and body weight of OLETF rats. Consistent with prior results, 4 wk of exercise also produced long-lasting effects on food intake and body weight in OLETF rats fed a regular chow. When running wheels were relocked, OLETF rats stabilized at lower levels of body weight than sedentary OLETF rats. However, access to a high-fat diet offset these effects. When OLETF rats were switched to a high-fat diet following wheel relocking, they significantly increased food intake and body weight, so that they reached levels similar to those of sedentary OLETF rats fed a high-fat diet. Gene expression determination of hypothalamic neuropeptides revealed changes that appeared to be appropriate responses to the effects of diet and running exercise. Together, these results demonstrate that high-fat diet modulates the long-lasting effects of exercise on food intake and body weight in OLETF rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1459-1467
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume300
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • Agouti-related peptide
  • Cholecystokinin 1 receptor
  • Dorsomedial hypotha-lamic nucleus
  • Neuropeptide Y
  • Proopiomelanocortin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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