High-Fat Diet Disrupts Behavioral and Molecular Circadian Rhythms in Mice

Akira Kohsaka, Aaron D. Laposky, Kathryn Moynihan Ramsey, Carmela Estrada, Corinne E. Joshu, Yumiko Kobayashi, Fred W. Turek, Joseph Bass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The circadian clock programs daily rhythms and coordinates multiple behavioral and physiological processes, including activity, sleep, feeding, and fuel homeostasis. Recent studies indicate that genetic alteration in the core molecular clock machinery can have pronounced effects on both peripheral and central metabolic regulatory signals. Many metabolic systems also cycle and may in turn affect function of clock genes and circadian systems. However, little is known about how alterations in energy balance affect the clock. Here we show that a high-fat diet in mice leads to changes in the period of the locomotor activity rhythm and alterations in the expression and cycling of canonical circadian clock genes, nuclear receptors that regulate clock transcription factors, and clock-controlled genes involved in fuel utilization in the hypothalamus, liver, and adipose tissue. These results indicate that consumption of a high-calorie diet alters the function of the mammalian circadian clock.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)414-421
Number of pages8
JournalCell Metabolism
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Circadian Clocks
High Fat Diet
Circadian Rhythm
Physiological Phenomena
Genes
Locomotion
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Hypothalamus
Adipose Tissue
Sleep
Homeostasis
Transcription Factors
Diet
Liver

Keywords

  • HUMDISEASE
  • SIGNALING

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Kohsaka, A., Laposky, A. D., Ramsey, K. M., Estrada, C., Joshu, C. E., Kobayashi, Y., ... Bass, J. (2007). High-Fat Diet Disrupts Behavioral and Molecular Circadian Rhythms in Mice. Cell Metabolism, 6(5), 414-421. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2007.09.006

High-Fat Diet Disrupts Behavioral and Molecular Circadian Rhythms in Mice. / Kohsaka, Akira; Laposky, Aaron D.; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Estrada, Carmela; Joshu, Corinne E.; Kobayashi, Yumiko; Turek, Fred W.; Bass, Joseph.

In: Cell Metabolism, Vol. 6, No. 5, 07.11.2007, p. 414-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kohsaka, A, Laposky, AD, Ramsey, KM, Estrada, C, Joshu, CE, Kobayashi, Y, Turek, FW & Bass, J 2007, 'High-Fat Diet Disrupts Behavioral and Molecular Circadian Rhythms in Mice', Cell Metabolism, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 414-421. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2007.09.006
Kohsaka, Akira ; Laposky, Aaron D. ; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan ; Estrada, Carmela ; Joshu, Corinne E. ; Kobayashi, Yumiko ; Turek, Fred W. ; Bass, Joseph. / High-Fat Diet Disrupts Behavioral and Molecular Circadian Rhythms in Mice. In: Cell Metabolism. 2007 ; Vol. 6, No. 5. pp. 414-421.
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