High extratumoral mast cell counts are associated with a higher risk of adverse prostate cancer outcomes

Heidi Hempel Sullivan, Christopher M. Heaphy, Ibrahim Kulac, Nathan Cuka, Jiayun Lu, John R. Barber, Angelo M. de Marzo, Tamara L. Lotan, Corinne E. Joshu, Karen S. Sfanos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Given our previous findings that low intratumoral and high extratumoral mast cell numbers are associated with higher risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy, we now assessed this relationship with race and the development of metastases. Methods: We stained for mast cell tryptase via IHC and fluorescent immunolabeling in 885 men across multiple tissue microarray sets designed to assess biomarkers in association with race and prostate cancer outcomes (median follow-up, 7.0 years). Results: Intratumoral and extratumoral mast cell counts were significantly lower in tissues from African-American compared with European-American men, but not within strata of cancer grade. There was no association between mast cell counts and ERG positivity, PTEN loss, or TP53 missense mutation. Higher minimum extratumoral mast cells were associated with an increased risk of biochemical recurrence [comparing highest with lowest tertiles: HR, 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-2.29; P trend ¼ 0.01]; this pattern was similar among European-American and African-American men and by grade of disease. There was no significant association between minimum intratumoral mast cell count and biochemical recurrence, overall or within strata of race and grade. Finally, high minimum number of extratumoral mast cells was associated with prostate cancer metastases (comparing highest with lowest tertiles: HR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.24-3.63; P trend ¼ 0.01). Conclusions: High extratumoral mast cell numbers are associated with biochemical recurrence and the development of metastases after radical prostatectomy. Impact: Higher numbers of benign tissue mast cells are associated with a higher risk of adverse outcomes after radical prostatectomy, including metastatic prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)668-675
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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