High Exercise Capacity Attenuates the Risk of Early Mortality After a First Myocardial Infarction: The Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) Project

Gabriel E. Shaya, Mouaz H. Al-Mallah, Rupert K. Hung, Khurram Nasir, Roger S Blumenthal, Jonathan K. Ehrman, Steven J. Keteyian, Clinton A. Brawner, Waqas T. Qureshi, Michael Blaha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of objectively measured exercise capacity (EC) on early mortality (EM) after a first myocardial infarction (MI).

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 2061 patients without a history of MI (mean age, 62±12 years; 38% [n=790] women; 56% [n=1153] white) who underwent clinical treadmill stress testing in the Henry Ford Health System from January 1, 1991, through May 31, 2009, and suffered MI during follow-up (MI event proportion, 3.4%; mean time from the exercise test to MI, 6.1±4.3 years). Exercise capacity was categorized on the basis of peak metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved: less than 6, 6 to 9, 10 to 11, and 12 or more METs. Early mortality was defined as all-cause mortality within 28, 90, or 365 days of MI. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of EC on the risk of mortality at each time point post-MI adjusting for baseline demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, medication use, indication for stress testing, and year of MI.

RESULTS: The 28-day EM rate was 10.6% overall, and 13.9%, 10.7%, 6.9%, and 6.0% in the less than 6, 6 to 9, 10 to 11, and 12 or more METs categories, respectively (P

CONCLUSION: Higher baseline EC was independently associated with a lower risk of early death after a first MI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-139
Number of pages11
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Myocardial Infarction
Exercise
Mortality
Metabolic Equivalent
Logistic Models
Exercise Test
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Demography
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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High Exercise Capacity Attenuates the Risk of Early Mortality After a First Myocardial Infarction : The Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) Project. / Shaya, Gabriel E.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; Hung, Rupert K.; Nasir, Khurram; Blumenthal, Roger S; Ehrman, Jonathan K.; Keteyian, Steven J.; Brawner, Clinton A.; Qureshi, Waqas T.; Blaha, Michael.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 91, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 129-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shaya, Gabriel E. ; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H. ; Hung, Rupert K. ; Nasir, Khurram ; Blumenthal, Roger S ; Ehrman, Jonathan K. ; Keteyian, Steven J. ; Brawner, Clinton A. ; Qureshi, Waqas T. ; Blaha, Michael. / High Exercise Capacity Attenuates the Risk of Early Mortality After a First Myocardial Infarction : The Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) Project. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2016 ; Vol. 91, No. 2. pp. 129-139.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of objectively measured exercise capacity (EC) on early mortality (EM) after a first myocardial infarction (MI).PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 2061 patients without a history of MI (mean age, 62±12 years; 38{\%} [n=790] women; 56{\%} [n=1153] white) who underwent clinical treadmill stress testing in the Henry Ford Health System from January 1, 1991, through May 31, 2009, and suffered MI during follow-up (MI event proportion, 3.4{\%}; mean time from the exercise test to MI, 6.1±4.3 years). Exercise capacity was categorized on the basis of peak metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved: less than 6, 6 to 9, 10 to 11, and 12 or more METs. Early mortality was defined as all-cause mortality within 28, 90, or 365 days of MI. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of EC on the risk of mortality at each time point post-MI adjusting for baseline demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, medication use, indication for stress testing, and year of MI.RESULTS: The 28-day EM rate was 10.6{\%} overall, and 13.9{\%}, 10.7{\%}, 6.9{\%}, and 6.0{\%} in the less than 6, 6 to 9, 10 to 11, and 12 or more METs categories, respectively (PCONCLUSION: Higher baseline EC was independently associated with a lower risk of early death after a first MI.",
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