High-dose discrimination training with midazolam: Context determines generalization profile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In previous work, greater differentiation among ligands for the benzodiazepine site was found in rats trained to discriminate among vehicle, 0.32, and 3.2 mg/kg midazolam than in animals trained to discriminate a single midazolam dose from vehicle (i.e., virtually all test drugs occasioned low-dose midazolam-appropriate responding, but most did not occasion high-dose midazolam-appropriate responding even at high test doses). A possibility was that merely training with 3.2 mg/kg-midazolam (not previously studied) would result in greater selectivity than training with lower midazolam doses. In the present study, rats were trained to discriminate 3.2 mg/kg IP midazolam from no drug under a two-lever, food-maintained, procedure; and drugs from the previous three-lever studies were tested. Triazolam, bretazenil, clonazepam, lorazepam, midazolam, zolpidem, chlordiazepoxide, pentobarbital, and flurazepam all dose-dependently occasioned >80% responding on the midazolam-appropriate lever in roughly that order of potency. Only triazolam had occasioned midazolam 3.2 mg/kg-appropriate responding in the previous work. The greater differentiation among these drugs in the dose-vs.-dose procedure likely was due to a training dose context rather than to the high training dose per se. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999

Keywords

  • Benzodiazepines
  • Bretazenil
  • Chlordiazepoxide
  • Clonazepam
  • Drug discrimination
  • Flurazepam
  • Lorazepam
  • Midazolam
  • Pentobarbital
  • Rats
  • Time course of discriminative effects
  • Training dose in drug discrimination
  • Triazolam
  • Zolpidem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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