High burden of staphylococcus aureus among native American individuals on the White Mountain Apache Tribal Lands

Catherine G. Sutcliffe, Lindsay R. Grant, Angelina Reid, Grace Douglass, Laura B. Brown, Kamellia Kellywood, Robert C. Weatherholtz, Robin Hubler, Alvaro Quintana, Ryan Close, James B. McAuley, Mathuram Santosham, Katherine L. O’Brien, Laura L. Hammitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. This study was done to determine the burden of invasive Staphylococcus aureus on the White Mountain Apache Tribal lands. Methods. Active population and laboratory-based surveillance for invasive S aureus infections was conducted from May 2016 to April 2018. A case was defined as a Native American individual living on or around the White Mountain Apache Tribal lands with S aureus isolated from a normally sterile body site. Results. Fifty-three cases were identified. Most cases were adults (90.6%) and had ≥1 underlying medical condition (86.8%), the most common of which were diabetes (49.1%) and obesity (41.5%). A total of 26.4% cases were categorized as community acquired. Most infections were methicillin-resistant (75.5%). A total of 7.5% of cases required amputation, and 7.7% of cases died within 30 days of initial culture. The incidence of invasive S aureus was 156.3 per 100 000 persons. The age-adjusted incidence of invasive methicillin-resistant S aureus was 138.2 per 100 000 persons. Conclusions. This community has a disproportionately high burden of invasive methicillin-resistant S aureus compared with the general US population. Interventions are urgently needed to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberofaa061
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • Invasive bacterial infections
  • MRSA
  • Native Americans
  • Surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Clinical Neurology

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