Hierarchical organization of the human auditory cortex revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging

C. M. Wessinger, J. Vanmeter, B. Tian, J. Van Lare, J. Pekar, J. P. Rauschecker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The concept of hierarchical processing - that the sensory world is broken down into basic features later integrated into more complex stimulus preferences - originated from investigations of the visual cortex. Recent studies of the auditory cortex in nonhuman primates revealed a comparable architecture, in which core areas, receiving direct input from the thalamus, in turn, provide input to a surrounding belt. Here functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) shows that the human auditory cortex displays a similar hierarchical organization: pure tones (PTs) activate primarily the core, whereas belt areas prefer complex sounds, such as narrow-band noise bursts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of cognitive neuroscience
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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