Hidden in plain sight

Jeremy Greene, David Herzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although the public health impact of direct-to-consumer (DTC) pharmaceutical advertising remains a subject of great controversy, such promotion is typically understood as a recent phenomenon permitted only by changes infederal regulation of print and broadcast advertising over the past two decades. But today's omnipresent ads are only the most recent chapter in a longer history of DTC pharmaceutical promotion (including the ghostwriting of popular articles, organization of public-relations events, and implicit advertising of products to consumers) stretching back over the twentieth century. We use trade literature and archival materials to examine the continuity of efforts to promote prescription drugs to consumers and to better grapple with the public health significance of contemporary pharmaceutical marketing practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-803
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume100
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Public Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Public Relations
Prescription Drugs
Marketing
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Hidden in plain sight. / Greene, Jeremy; Herzberg, David.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 100, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 793-803.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greene, Jeremy ; Herzberg, David. / Hidden in plain sight. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2010 ; Vol. 100, No. 5. pp. 793-803.
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